Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: April ::
Re: Branagh's *Ado*; *Theater of Envy"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 268.  Tuesday, 27 April 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Jean Peterson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 1993 12:50:01 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0263  More on Branagh's *Ado*
 
(2)     From:   NAOMI LIEBLER <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Apr 93 09:47:00 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0265  *Theater of Envy*; Stepmothers; *TNK*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 1993 12:50:01 -0400
Subject: 4.0263  More on Branagh's *Ado*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0263  More on Branagh's *Ado*
 
>Keaton plays [Dogberry] as a psycho--the town loon, who has
>been given the constable's job because no one else wants it, and
>because the criminally insane might be pretty good at law enforcement.
>I liked the violence in the interrogation scene; it made perfect
>sense, and helped explain Borachio's confession, which is something
>that I've never bought.
>
>I've always thought that the Dogberry scenes were hard to play
>anyway.  The change of tone is SO great.  Going all the way and
>depicting the seed, violent side of the Renaissance underclass as
>really seedy and violent was a refreshing change.
 
I found Paul Budra's comments on Keaton's Dogberry quite provocative --
especially since, in the film, class distinctions in the main plot
were all but erased.  Who could tell the difference between Beatrice & Hero,
and the maids (especially since all wore the same gauzy, sexy dresses, were
barefoot, and Beatrice's maid was played by Thompson's real-life mom?)
 
So unimpressed is Leonato with his worldly status that he wears his
everyday peasantly garb for his daughter's wedding (lines about Hero's rich
wedding gown are conveniently cut, and she doesn't bother to change her
clothes either).
 
So the distinctions of class are sentimentally elided, and the return of
the repressed occurs in the underplot as a demonized & psychopathic
underclass...weird.
 
Jean Peterson
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           NAOMI LIEBLER <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Apr 93 09:47:00 EST
Subject: 4.0265  *Theater of Envy*; Stepmothers; *TNK*
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0265  *Theater of Envy*; Stepmothers; *TNK*
 
For Susan Harris, who wanted to know how Girard's "Theater of Envy" plays in
Peoria: By the time he got to "A Theater of Envy," Girard's representation of
the mimetic double did indeed come across as reductive, not to mention
reiterative. But what he's reiterating there is a theoretical position he had
already worked out--and much more carefully and compellingly, I think--in two
earlier works, "Deceit, Desire, and the Novel" (Johns Hopkins UP, 1965) and
"Violence and the Sacred" (Johns Hoplins UP, 1977), and in books less readily
available here, "The Scapegoat" and "Things Hidden Since the Beginning of the
World." One of the many difficulties "Theater of Envy" presents to the reader
is its superficial summation of these earlier efforts. If you want to trace
Girard's theoretic, in a form more rigorously worked out than in this latest
book, have a look at some of the earlier works.
 
Cheers,
Naomi C. Liebler
Dept. of English
Montclair State College
Upper MOntclair, NJ 07043
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.