1993

Hamnet Sadler

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 250.  Wednesday, 21 April 1993.
 
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 21 Apr 93 10:00:34 EDT
Subject: 4.0248  *R&J* Poison; Hamlett Sadler?
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0248  *R&J* Poison; Hamlett Sadler?
 
> Hamnet Sadler did not sign his name Hamlett as a witness on the will,
> as can be seen very plainly on any facsimilie. There is a possibility
> that he spelled it Hanmet, as N's and M's have a way of looking like
> one another, but there is definitely no "l" in the signature.
 
I hate it when that happens. That's what I get for trying to write
something from memory.
 
John Mucci is right: Hamnet Sadler signed his name Hamnet. What I was
remembering was the bequest itself. On page 2 of the will, Shakespeare
and/or Francis Collins and/or Collins' clerk wrote: "Item I gyve &
bequeath to mr Richard Tyler thelder xxvjs viijd to buy him A Ringe..."
Sometime later, "mr Richard Tyler thelder" was crossed out, and the name
"Hamlett Sadler" was written above the line. (See Chambers, Facts and
Problems, vol. II, p. 172.)
 
The basic point, that the names might have been used interchangeably,
remains.
 
Tad Davis
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sabbatical Year House for Rent

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 249.  Wednesday, 21 April 1993.
 
From:           NAOMI LIEBLER <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 93 23:37:00 EST
Subject:        New Jersey? What exit? (Sabbatical year house for rent)
 
Dear SHAKSPERians and/or colleagues,
 
Anybody planning to be in or near NYC for a/y 93-94 and prefering to live in
suburbia? I'm off on a well-earned sabbatical (aren't they all well-earned?)
and would like to rent out my small, 3-bedroom, fully furnished house (with a
wood-burning fireplace and plenty of wood).  30 minutes from Manhattan by
car, bus, or commuter train.  Available from August 1st.
 
For further particulars, contact me on e-mail: "This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."
 
Cheers,
Naomi Liebler

CFP: Shakespeare on Film and Television

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 247.  Tuesday, 20 April 1993.
 
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 1993 07:49 EDT
Subject:        Shakespeare on Film and Television session at NEMLA
 
Call for papers: Shakespeare on Film and Television session at NEMLA.
 
April 8-10, 1994, in beautiful Pittsburgh.  Topic: Reading Strange Matters:
Material Texts and Filmic Media.
 
The last decade has re-formed critical approaches to Shakespearean texts. New
editorial practices challenge the notion of textual stability; and performance
theories emphasize unrecorded transformation of the written record; cultural
materialists give social specificity to the conventions of stage and page;
historians of print culture focus on the readers' uses of print artifacts.
Thus, these too too solid texts have been de-stabilized -- and at the same time
have re-materialized as commodities not unmixed with baser matter.
 
This new attention to the material nature of the play texts must transform our
approaches to the complex relations between play texts and on-screen
productions.  How have classic productions of Shakespeare mediated between the
material natures of print and audiovisual media? To what extent have recent
productions of Shakespeare made use of destablized notions of the textual
condition?
 
Suggested approaches: Cinematographic responses to textual cruxes or
instability; cinematographic representations of play texts, of reading
practices, and of print culture; the material conditions of various media as
they inflect performance; the book as a figure of human materiality; credits as
texts.
 
Stipulations: papers/abstrats to chair by 9/15/93. Each final paper should
incorporate 5-10 minutes of edited video clips.
 
        The above submitted by Lori Humphrey Newcomb
        Department of English
        West Chester University
        West Chester, PA 19383
 
Added note: write to her via snail mail for further info or ideas.

*R&J* Poison; Hamlett Sadler?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 248.  Tuesday, 20 April 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 20 Apr 1993 11:35:00 -0300
        Subj:   Poison in R&J
 
(2)     From:   John Mucci <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 20 Apr 93 21:44:00 UT
        Subj:   Hamlett Sadler?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 1993 11:35:00 -0300
Subject:        Poison in R&J
 
Hi,
 
About the potion in *Romeo and Juliet*:  I understand that puffer
fish poison drops one into a deep comatose, with no signs of
life.  In some parts of Japan, the dead are traditionally laid in
state for several days as a result.  Puffer fish is an important
ingredient in zombification.
 
A fellow called Praz, in Machiavelli and the Elizabethans (I'm
sorry, I don't have a citation, but it was written sometime in
the 1930s) gave several other examples of exaggerated poisons in
Elizabethan drama, such as one that lay dormant in the blood for
48 hours and then killed the bearer instantly.  Looking for a
specific ingredient may be a little misguided, therefore, since
whatever had originally inspired a poison to feign death, had
probably been alterred by previous literary uses to the point of
being unrecognizable.
 
Anyway, good luck!
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 93 21:44:00 UT
Subject:        Hamlett Sadler?
 
Hamnet Sadler did not sign his name Hamlett as a witness on the will,
as can be seen very plainly on any facsimilie. There is a possibility
that he spelled it Hanmet, as N's and M's have a way of looking like
one another, but there is definitely no "l" in the signature.
 
So far as the interlineations in the will go, the two most striking lines
of the will--the infamous second-best bed, and the rings given to the
theatre colleagues,  Heminges/Condell--seem to be afterthoughts, which
may mean nothing at all, or may have been written by another hand at a
later time.  Also, many lesser dramatists than Shakespeare left wills
which had voluminous enumerations of the books they were proud to own
and bequeath: either the second best bed was more important than the
books, or, as Schoenbaum puts it, they were part of the possessions
which naturally would fall to the heirs, or he didn't own any.

Re: *Ulysses* and *Hamlet*; *Shakespeare Survey*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 246.  Monday, 19 April 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Susan Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1993 10:30:29 +0501 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0239 Re: *Ulysses* and *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Nick Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1993 09:06:49 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0241  *Shakespeare Studies*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1993 10:30:29 +0501 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0239 Re: *Ulysses* and *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0239 Re: *Ulysses* and *Hamlet*
 
To everyone who responded to the Scylla and Charybdis questions:
Your help was greatly appreciated. I now know more about the secondbest
best bed than I ever dreamed I would. Thanks a great bunch.
 
Hoopsa boyaboy hoopsa!
 
Susan Harris
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1993 09:06:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0241  *Shakespeare Studies*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0241  *Shakespeare Studies*
 
Wonderful news.  I will look forward to the next volume with keen
anticipation.
 
Nick Clary

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