1993

Re: Speaking the Verse

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 230.  Thursday, 8 April 1993.
 
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Apr 1993 11:04 EDT
Subject: 4.0224  Re: Speaking the Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0224  Re: Speaking the Verse
 
To Timothy Dayne Pinnow and Skip Shand--thanks for your reply.  I believe you.
I am not an actor, but I have long felt that F1 provides wonderful clues. I
am reminded of a story, however. A dr. who had had wonderful success in the
stock market, interviewed by a local paper, explained his methods. He not
only read the financial reports of his favorite company but actually visited
it in the middle of the night to see what was going on. Driving to the back
loading dock, he saw frenetic activity as boxes of product were loaded on
huge trucks. He bought and prospered. The only trouble was that he did not
realize that the back loading dock belonged to a different company, not the
one he was studying. That company did not ship large boxes of product but
operated in a different way altogether. Still, he made a lot of money, so
his system worked for him. If it works for the actor, then that's fine.
But if someone is interested in discovering what happened (a futile study
probably) the evidence could be misleading. Does anyone else have any ideas
on the topic?
 
Thanks again,
Bernice

Re: Reflections

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 229.  Wednesday, 7 April 1993.
 
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Apr 93 07:45 EST
Subject: 4.0225  Reflections
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0225  Reflections
 
Dear Tad:
 
Would it be appropriate for me to list your play, with its "Shakespearean"
accidentals in my spring Medieval/Renaissance Drama Society Newsletter, do
you think?
 
Best,
Milla Riggio

Re: *R&J* for Pre-College Students

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 227.  Wednesday, 7 April 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Robert O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Apr 1993 13:03:41 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0220  Q: *R&J* for Pre-College Students
 
(2)     From:   Tom Loughlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 6 Apr 1993 11:04 pm EDT (Wed, 7 Apr 93 03:04:05 UT)
        Subj:   R&J
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Apr 1993 13:03:41 +1000
Subject: 4.0220  Q: *R&J* for Pre-College Students
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0220  Q: *R&J* for Pre-College Students
 
John Massa asked:
 
>Does anyone have any words of wisdom or experience about how to approach a
>production of Romeo & Juliet where all the roles are played by 17-19 year olds,
>most of whom have acting experience from school productions but little or no
>exposure to Shakespeare?
>If you have done something like this before, how did you begin with them?  Any
>unexpected problems?  Anthing you wished you had emphasized earlier?  (Or
>should we just get on with it and stop asking so many questions?!!)
 
A few years ago, I was relieving someone else's high-school Lit. class and
they were doing R&J - the first time I had encountered a class at this
level doing Shakespeare (Note: up to about 8 years ago it was possible to
go through school in my home state and not read a word of Shakespeare!).
 
The average age of this class was about 15.
 
I found little problem in working with that class and play - once most of
them had overcome their antipathy towards the verse they found themselves
thoroughly absorbed, especially after one of the girls realised that Juliet
was only a little younger than they. They particularly enjoyed the smuttier
aspects of Mercutio's speeches, an appeal I have noticed is almost
universal to that age group! I don't think there's a bettter play to start
Shakespeare with, for teenagers.
 
I don't think that any special way of beginning is necessary, other than
to emphasise speaking rather than versifying, at least at the outset. The
problem is always the 'romantic' scenes, no matter how much experience kids
that age have. Expect giggles and red faces - even from yourself!
 
ROC
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Loughlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Apr 1993 11:04 pm EDT (Wed, 7 Apr 93 03:04:05 UT)
Subject:        R&J
 
I agree with Steve, John - let it rip.  I'd encourage the kids to put all
the intensity and passion of their age into the performace - you won't get
a polished production, but I think it's impotant that they see that WS
wrote with a tremendous amount of feeling and passion.  If there's one
thing 17-19 year-olds have, it's energy and passion.
 
      ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Tom Loughlin                *   BITNET
      Dept. of Theatre Arts       *    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
      SUNY College at Fredonia    *   INTERNET
      Fredonia NY 14063           *    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
      Voice: 716.673.3597         *
      Fax:   716.673.3397         *   "Hail, hail Freedonia, land of
                                  *    the brave and free."  G. Marx
      ---------------------------------------------------------------

Re: Speaking the Verse

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 228.  Wednesday, 7 April 1993.
 
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Apr 93 23:05 EST
Subject: 4.0224  Re: Speaking the Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0224  Re: Speaking the Verse
 
Regarding Folio (and even quarto) punctuation:  Audrey Stanley is now
teaching a voice and acting workshop for me at Trinity College, and she
has us all drilled into remembering that punctuation in Elizabethan/
Jacobean poetic texts is less frequent than in modern texts, and that
its meaning often has more to do with vocal expression (in the case of
plays especially) than with grammatical necessity.  If you keep this
in mind, looking to both quarto and folio punctuations as a guide to
reading, more than as grammatical markers, the results can be very
helpful.  You end up with a lot more commas and many fewer colons and
semi-colons than in our modern editions of Shakespeare, but the
commas are often meaningful to the verse as spoken expressions.
 
Just one more small voice in an ongoing discussion . . . .
 
Best,
Milla Riggio

Re: Electronic Text Concordance Software

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 226.  Wednesday, 7 April 1993.
 
From:           Phyllis Rackin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Apr 1993 19:04:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0209  Electronic Text Concordance Program
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0209  Electronic Text Concordance Program
 
A question in response to Robert O'Connor's good news about the public
domain program available via ftp that will write a concordance for an
electronic text: does anyone know of a similar program, similarly
available, that will work on IBM systems?
 
[Editor's Note: You may wish to consider TACT, a program developed at
the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at the University of Toronto.
Below is a December 2, 1992, SHAKSPER posting from Ian Lancashire that
describes how to obtain the file from FTP. --hmc]
 
 
===============================================================================
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 347. Wednesday, 2 December 1992.
 
From:           Ian Lancashire <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 Dec 1992 18:04:05 -0500
Subject:        Software for analysis
 
TACT 1.2B (1991) for MS-DOS is available without charge for FTP
transfer to your account from epas.utoronto.ca.  TACT does interactive
concordances, indexes, distribution graphs, frequency lists, collocate
tables, fixed phrase lists, etc.
 
Generally (details may vary from site to site), you start FTP to this
site by typing
 
        ftp epas.utoronto.ca
 
and then move into the pub/cch/tact/dist1.2B subdirectory.  Do a
directory (type `dir') and you will see the files.  To have them
returned to your account, type
 
        get <filename>
 
and be sure to set `binary' as the transfer mode (I think this is
the default).
 
You can just get a description of TACT by retrieving `whatis.tact'.
A listserv exists to answer questions about using the program.
 
We are working closely with MLA now to publish the documentation of a new
version, 2.0 (yet to be released), and hope that this will happen in
the coming year.
 
 
Ian Lancashire
Dept. of English, New College
Director, Centre for Computing in the Humanities
Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. M5S 1A1, CANADA
Voice: (416) 978-8279; FAX: (416) 978-6519
E-mail: ian @ epas.utoronto.ca

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