1993

Electronic Text Concordance Program

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 209.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
From:           Robert O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Apr 1993 09:56:35 +1000
Subject:        Electronic Text and Concordance.
 
My apologies if this is old news, but I discovered quite by accident
yesterday a public domain program which will write a concordance for an
electronic text. I have already used it myself on etexts of several
Shakespearean works - it will only work on text-only files - and it will
write a concordance of a play in about three to five minutes. There are
various ways of modifying what words are included or omitted, and how they
are cited and referenced.
 
I obtained the software via ftp (the Fetch!) program from an Australian
site, but it can also be found at a number of other locations:
 
Host archie.au   (139.130.4.6)
Last updated 18:20  3 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /micros/mac/info-mac/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
 
Host uhunix2.uhcc.hawaii.edu   (128.171.44.7)
Last updated 09:28  3 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /mirrors/info-mac/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
 
Host sics.se   (192.16.123.90)
Last updated 04:31  3 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /pub/info-mac/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
 
Host nic.switch.ch   (130.59.1.40)
Last updated 01:43  3 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /software/mac/info-mac-shadow/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
    Location: /mirror/info-mac/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
 
Host isfs.kuis.kyoto-u.ac.jp   (130.54.20.1)
Last updated 00:09  3 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /Mac/info-mac/app
      FILE      concordance-171.hqx
 
Host ftp.uu.net   (192.48.96.9)
Last updated 22:46  2 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /systems/mac/info-mac/app
      FILE     concordance-171.hqx
 
Host ftp.uni-kl.de   (131.246.9.95)
Last updated 22:39  2 Mar 1993
 
    Location: /pub/mac/app
      FILE     concordance-171.hqx
 
I got quite excited about finding this program: while their are plenty of
concordances available in the ANU libraries I don't think it hurts to have
one ready to hand, and on disk too!
 
ROC

Q: Shakespeare Audition Monologue

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 208.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
From:           Damon Tribble <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1993 11:58:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Shakespeare Monologues
 
     Hi there!  My name is Damon Tribble and I am located at the University of
Redlands here in sunny (lately rainy) Southern California.  I begin my
first journey into the world of E-mail discussion groups with a request
for comments and advice on an audition monologue I am preparing.  This is
my first experience with Shakespearean acting and my first classical
monologue, so I would appreciate any feedback you can give on the character,
the rhythm of the verse, the staging, auditioning for Shakespeare, and
Shakespearean acting in general.
 
     The piece I am currently working on comes from King Henry the Fourth
Part I, Act I, Scene iii.  In this speech, the young hothead Hotspur is
trying to explain to the king why he refused to turn over his prisoners of
war in a recent battle.  Here is the piece:
 
(These are my own line numbers for easy reference)
 
1  My liege, I did deny no prisoners.
2  But I remember, when the fight was done,
3  When I was dry with rage and extreme toil,
4  Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword,
5  Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly drest,
6  Fresh as a bridegroom; and his chin new reapt
7  Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home;
8  He was perfumed like a milliner;
9  And 'twixt his finger and his thumb he held
10 A pouncet-box, which ever and anon
11 He gave his nose, and took't away again;--
12 Who therewtih angry, when it next came there,
13 Took it in snuff:--and still he smiled and talkt;
14 And as the soldiers bore dead bodies by,
15 He call'd them untaught knaves, unmannerly,
16 To bring a slovenly unhandsome corse
17 Betwixt the wind and his nobility.
18 With many holiday and lady terms
19 He questioned me; amongst the rest, demanded
20 My prisoners in your majesty's behalf.
21 I then, all smarting with my wounds being cold.
22 To be so pester'd with a popinjay,
23 Out of my grief and my impatience,
24 Answer'd neglectingly, I know not what,--
25 He should, or he should not; for he made me mad
26 To see him shine so brisk, and smell so sweet,
27 And talk so like a waiting-gentlewoman
28 Of guns and drums and wounds,--God save the mark!--
29 And telling me the sovereign'st thing on earth
30 Was parmaceti for an inward bruise;
31 And that it was great pity, so it was,
32 This villainous salt-petre should be digg'd
33 Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
34 Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd
35 So cowardly; and but for these vile guns,
36 He would himself have been a soldier.
37 This bald unjointed chat of his, my lord,
38 I answer'd indirectly, as I said;
39 And I beseech you, let not his report
40 Come current for an accusation
41 Betwixt my love and your high majesty.
 
     I have noticed that lines 5, 19, 21, 25, 27, and 34 have eleven syllables
per line and lines 23, 36, and 40 have only nine per line.  How does this
variance from iambic pentameter affect the rhythm of the line?  In the
lines with nine beats would one say "im-pa-ti-ence" or "sol-di-er" or
"ac-cu-sa-ti-on" to make them into ten?
 
     I am also looking for another audition piece of Shakespearean verse
which contrasts with this one.  I am especially trying to avoid pieces
which are overdone.  I am 21 years old, blond, and of medium height and
build.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
     Lastly, if anyone can suggest any good books on the subject of
Shakespearean acting please let me know.
 
     Thank you for any advice you can offer...
                                             Damon Tribble
                                             This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Audience Participation

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 206.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
(1)     From:   William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 93 22:03:55 EST
        Subj:   Audience Participation (Iago)
 
(2)     From:   Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1993 22:39:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Audience Participation
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 93 22:03:55 EST
Subject:        Audience Participation (Iago)
 
I've always understood Iago's soliloquy beginning
 
"And what's he then that says I\ play the villain"
 
(Evans text, 2.3.336ff) as addressed directly to the audience.
 
The audience has already judged his advice to Cassio villainous,
so Iago argues with us for a while -- then concedes that we're right
and celebrates his villainy.
 
Bill Kemp
Mary Washington College
Fredericksburg, Va.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1993 22:39:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Audience Participation
 
In *Metadrama in Shakespeare's Henriad* James Calderwood provides
extensive--perhaps too extensive?--commentary on audience participation,
or at least audience engagement, in the second tetralogy.  Among other
things, Calderwood suggests that Hal's speech at the end of 1.2 in *1 Henry
IV* ("I know you all, and will a while uphold/ The unyok'd humor of your
idleness . . .") is directed at the audience, as a metadramatic gesture that
links the theater with Falstaff's tavern world.  The promise that he will end
the play by "Redeeming time when men think least I will" is therefore a
threat not only to Falstaff, but also to the audience, which is complicit in
Falstaff's idleness and would wish to extend it.  With that in mind,
Calderwood further argues that Falstaff's claim to have killed Hotspur at the
end of *1 Henry IV* is a challenge to Hal's control of time and of
representation, and so Falstaff extends the play into another set of five acts
(*2 Henry IV*), to the delight of the idle audience as of the idle Falstaff.
Direct address to the audience in *Henry V* is taken up by the Chorus,
who points out both the limits of representation and the limits of
"redeeming time."
 
Al Cacicedo (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Albright College

Rs: Q1 *Hamlet* Texts for the Stage

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 207.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 March 93, 11:23:22 EST
        Subj:   Text of Q1 {Hamlet}
 
(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 93 19:08 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0205  Q: Q1 Hamlet Texts for the Stage
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 March 93, 11:23:22 EST
Subject:        Text of Q1 {Hamlet}
 
There should be one in the Oxford Text Archive (contact
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. [that is Lou Burnard, in charge of the OTA, and on
this list]), and, since it will be only lightly marked-up and in ASCII,
it might easily be retrieved into a word-processor and then divided
according to scenes or characters (but beware of variants in speech
prefixes!).
 
Roy Flannagan
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 93 19:08 CST
Subject: 4.0205  Q: Q1 Hamlet Texts for the Stage
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0205  Q: Q1 Hamlet Texts for the Stage
 
I suggest you have a look at +Hamlet Prince of Denmarke+ edited
by Holderness and Loughrey in the Shakespearean Originals series
published in 1992 by Harvester Wheatsheaf.  The ISBN of the
paperback is 0-7450-1100-4 and of the hardback 0-7450-1099-7.
It is an edited version of Q1.
 
I tried to use it in my undergraduate Shakespeare class last
semester but our incompetent bookstore couldn't get it in.
 
William Proctor Williams           TB0WPW1@NIU
English/Northern Illinois University

Q: Q1 Hamlet Texts for the Stage

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 205.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
From:           Peter Ayers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1993 06:53:02 -0500
Subject:        Q1 Hamlet Texts for the Stage
 
Our drama program is proposing a production of Q1 Hamlet and have asked
me to prepare a working text (ie one where the obviously corrupt bits are
replaced by Q2/F equivalents.  It would be easy enough, but I assume that
this has been done frequently, and that therefore there are probably
such texts available already.  Does anyone know of such things?
 
Peter Ayers
Dept. of English
Memorial University of Newfoundland
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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