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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: March ::
Rs: "the naked new-born babe"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 128.  Thursday, 4 March 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Daniel Pigg <IVAD@UTMARTN.bitnet>
        Date:   Thursday, 04 Mar 93 14:25:53 CST
        Subj:   SHK 4.0126 Q: "a naked new-born babe"
 
(2)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
        Date:   Thursday, 4 Mar 1993 15:48 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0126  Q: "a naked new-born babe"
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Pigg <IVAD@UTMARTN.bitnet>
Date:           Thursday, 04 Mar 93 14:25:53 CST
Subject: Q: "a naked new-born babe"
Comment:        SHK 4.0126 Q: "a naked new-born babe"
 
I'm not sure the new critical reading of Brooks is the best, especially
given his obvious ahistoricism.
 
Dan Pigg
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
Date:           Thursday, 4 Mar 1993 15:48 EDT
Subject: 4.0126  Q: "a naked new-born babe"
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0126  Q: "a naked new-born babe"
 
I can't help jumping in also.  I discusss the passage in my recent book
*Macbeth* in the Manchester UP series on Shakespeare in Performance, p. 6. I
agree that Brooks is interesting and suggestive, but this is what I wrote:
"What can listeners make of the language of Macbeth's hesitancy about murdering
Duncan?  Readers have difficulty untangling the metaphoric layers to understand
Macbeth's state of mind. Sensitive to and appreciative of metaphor as
Shakespeares's audience may have been, it is hard to believe that, even were
the speech spoken with studied deliberateness, they would get more than flashes
of images and the emotive intent, conveyed largely through intonation, gesture,
and expression." I see this obscure language as a element of Shakespeare's
characterization of Macbeth and contrast his language with Lady Macbeth's much
clearer language.
 
Cheers,
 

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