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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: March ::
Re: Productions of *TGV*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 178.  Thursday, 18 March 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Thursday, 18 Mar 1993 11:09:05 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Dog's part in TGV
 
(2)     From:   Stephen Orgel <
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        Date:   Thursday, 18 Mar 93 10:23:30 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0177  Re: College Productios of *TGV*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Thursday, 18 Mar 1993 11:09:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Dog's part in TGV
 
Although productions of TGV tend to use a real dog on stage, no evidence
suggests that Shakespeare's company did so.  The only real dog part written
for the Globe was in Jonson's EVERY MAN OUT OF HIS HUMOUR (1599).  Other
dogs are either walk-ons or noises off.
 
Helen Ostovich
McMaster University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <
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Date:           Thursday, 18 Mar 93 10:23:30 PST
Subject: 4.0177  Re: College Productios of *TGV*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0177  Re: College Productios of *TGV*
 
Three years ago I saw a production by the Asian Students' Drama Society
at Harvard. It was pretty incompetent, though it had some interesting
ideas, first about cross-casting--Proteus played by a woman dressed
like Mme Mao, and second about Launce, a redheaded Irish boy, the only
non-Asian in the production. The dog was a green stuffed dinosaur; it
did not upstage anyone, not that it would have mattered.
 
HOWEVER, Adrian Kiernander, Australian director/professor at the
U of Queensland (he's on the network, but away from his e-mail at the
moment) has just done what sounds like a brilliant college production
at the U of Wellington in New Zealand. You can get some idea of it
from the poster, which he sent me: it has two boys sunbathing with a
dog, and across the top "VERONA 90210" The dog was the largest St
Bernard he'd ever seen.
 
Cheers,
 
S.O.
 

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