Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: March ::
Re: Audience Participation
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 206.  Wednesday, 31 March 1993.
 
(1)     From:   William Kemp <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 93 22:03:55 EST
        Subj:   Audience Participation (Iago)
 
(2)     From:   Al Cacicedo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Mar 1993 22:39:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Audience Participation
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Kemp <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 93 22:03:55 EST
Subject:        Audience Participation (Iago)
 
I've always understood Iago's soliloquy beginning
 
"And what's he then that says I\ play the villain"
 
(Evans text, 2.3.336ff) as addressed directly to the audience.
 
The audience has already judged his advice to Cassio villainous,
so Iago argues with us for a while -- then concedes that we're right
and celebrates his villainy.
 
Bill Kemp
Mary Washington College
Fredericksburg, Va.

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Mar 1993 22:39:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Audience Participation
 
In *Metadrama in Shakespeare's Henriad* James Calderwood provides
extensive--perhaps too extensive?--commentary on audience participation,
or at least audience engagement, in the second tetralogy.  Among other
things, Calderwood suggests that Hal's speech at the end of 1.2 in *1 Henry
IV* ("I know you all, and will a while uphold/ The unyok'd humor of your
idleness . . .") is directed at the audience, as a metadramatic gesture that
links the theater with Falstaff's tavern world.  The promise that he will end
the play by "Redeeming time when men think least I will" is therefore a
threat not only to Falstaff, but also to the audience, which is complicit in
Falstaff's idleness and would wish to extend it.  With that in mind,
Calderwood further argues that Falstaff's claim to have killed Hotspur at the
end of *1 Henry IV* is a challenge to Hal's control of time and of
representation, and so Falstaff extends the play into another set of five acts
(*2 Henry IV*), to the delight of the idle audience as of the idle Falstaff.
Direct address to the audience in *Henry V* is taken up by the Chorus,
who points out both the limits of representation and the limits of
"redeeming time."
 
Al Cacicedo (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 )
Albright College
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.