1993

R: Assorted Queries

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 149.  Monday, 8 March 1993.
 
From:           Robert O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Mar 1993 13:43:39 +1000
Subject: 4.0132  Assorted Queries
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0132  Assorted Queries
 
 Roy Flannagan asked:
 
>Is the audience really supposed to like Sir Toby Belch?  I have one
>student (not notably puritanical), who finds more to like about Malvolio
>than Sir Toby.
 
I have always had a soft spot for 'Twelfth Night' - it was one of the plays
that got me hooked on Shakespeare in the first place - and like many people
I suppose I am often troubled by the torments meted out to Malvolio toward
the end of the play. I always thought his "I'll be revenged on the whole
pack of you" begged for a sequel (any takers?).
 
Considering some of the nasty things said in other plays about English
drinking habits (for example by Stephano and Trinculo in 'Tempest') I think
if nothing else Sir Toby is intended to be as familiar a figure to an
Elizabethan audience as Malvolio, and perhaps just as reviled. The trio
formed by these two and Andrew Aguecheek may be funny, even likable, but
they are not admirable.
 
ROC

Effect of Computer Technologies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 148.  Sunday, 7 March 1993.
 
From:           Jeff Nyhoff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 7 Mar 93 16:17:47 -0800
Subject:        [Effect of Computer Technologies]
 
The recent article regarding computer-aided instruction in Shakespeare studies
prods me toward a request I've been meaning to submit to this group:
 
My dissertation work is in need of a clearer idea of the present and potential
effect of recent computer technologies upon scholarship and pedagogy in the
areas of dramatic literature and theatre.  Consequently, I'm keenly interested
in hearing from SHAKSPERians regarding how such technologies (networks,
multimedia, hypertext/hypermedia, etc.) have had and might have impact upon
their work.  Any related bibliographic recommendations would also be greatly
appreciated.
 
I'm fairly new to the group, so forgive me if there has already been
substantial discussion related to this; if this is the case, then perhaps
someone could refer me to the proper section of the group's archives?
 
Please -- even the shortest note would be of great use to me.
Feel free to e-mail to me directly (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Jeff Nyhoff

Another R: "a naked new-born babe"

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 146.  Sunday, 7 March 1993.
 
From:           Kay Stockholder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 7 Mar 93 14:01:48 PST
Subject: R: "a naked new-born babe"
Comment:        SHK 4.0142  R: "a naked new-born babe"
 
Throughout the first part of the play the minds of Lady Macbeth and Macbeth are
perfectly attuned to each other. She knows that Macbeth's tender side
represents a danger to their enterprise, just as he does. In this sense they
collude in surpressing it, but, unlike her, he knows ahead of time that the
milky tenderness, the impulses to nurture and be nurtured, represented in the
image of the babe, that are being violated will return and take their toll. In
this way the play as a whole argues for the existence of a natural
law,inscribed in the unconscious if not the conscious, that render sin the
instrument of its own punishment.

Tracing Actors Through the Plays

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 147.  Sunday, 7 March 1993.
 
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 7 March 93, 17:53:59 EST
Subject:        Tracing actors through the plays
 
This is a large question, and may come out of a still-larger ignorance.
Has any scholar speculated very carefully about which of the various
members of acting companies (outside of the very famous, such as Armin,
Kemp, and Burbage) acted various parts?  We have slips in printed texts
that might indicate the presence of various actors like Kemp, and we
have legends, such as that of Shakespeare playing Adam in {As You Like
It} or the ghost of Hamlet's father, but has anyone worked out a tree of
probable associations?  Was the actor who played Jaques a kind of Emmett
Kelly type who always did melancholy, and what of those two matched
pairs of male and "female" romantic leads who did Lysander and Demetrius
and Helena and Hermia, then Benedick and Claudio and Beatrice and Hero?
Who did the perennial Prince or Duke?  Did the shorter boy actor have
less of a dramatic range than the taller?  Did the Benedick male lead
become the dominant one by force of his acting skills?  Did the boy
actor who played Katherina play Beatrice?  Portia?  How many sensitive,
witty, singing clowns did Robert Armin play?  How would the boy actor
who did, say, Katherina, move on to Lady Macbeth or Cleopatra?  I know
the chronology of the plays is uncertain, but certainly associations
among characters such as Bottom and Dogberry, and the actor who
presumably played both of them, can be made.  There is at least a
fascinating web of associations to be made, if someone hasn't done it
(and no, I don't want to do it).
 
Roy Flannagan

New on the SHAKSPER FileServer: COMPUTER TEACHING

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 145.  Sunday, 7 March 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 7 March 1993
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER FileServer: COMPUTER TEACHING
 
 
As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve COMPUTER TEACHING from the SHAKSPER
FileServer.  COMPUTER TEACHING contains two articles by Michael Lamonico about
using the Riverside Shakespeare with WordCruncher to teach Shakespeare to high
school students (excerpts below).
 
SHAKSPEReans can retrieve COMPUTER TEACHING by issuing the interactive command,
"TELL LISTSERV AT UTORONTO GET COMPUTER TEACHING SHAKSPER."  If your network
link does not support the interactive "TELL" command (i.e. if you are not
directly on Bitnet), or if LISTSERV rejects your request, then send a one-line
mail message (without a subject line) to LISTSERV@utoronto, reading "GET
COMPUTER TEACHING SHAKSPER."
 
Should you have difficulty receiving this file, please contact the editor,
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
 
For an updated version of the file list, send the command "GET SHAKSPER FILES
SHAKSPER" in the same fashion.  For further information, consult the
appropriate section of your SHAKSPER GUIDE.
 
===============================================================================
 
1. TEACHING SHAKESPEARE WITH A COMPUTER, By MICHAEL LAMONICO
 
Teaching Shakespeare with a computer sounds like an oxymoron. The very idea
of high school students exploring the language of the foremost writer in
history on a high tech machine seems ludicrous. My colleagues scoffed at the
idea, thinking that the mechanization of this process would result in nothing
more than lists of meaningless data. In a way this was my first reaction when
I first heard of WordCruncher, a concordance and text retrieval program
combined with The Riverside Shakespeare's Complete Works.  But after
convincing my school to order this program in 1988, my teaching has undergone
a radical change, and I have spread my discoveries to teachers everywhere.
 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 
2. "SEEK ME OUT BY COMPUTATION"
 
After assigning my students a project that required the Shakespeare
Concordance, I was told by our school's computer director that the electronic
version of the Riverside Shakespeare and WordCruncher had arrived and was
ready to use. Later that day, as I sat at the computer and became familiar
with the program, one of my students sat at the next terminal and asked if he
could try it. Within 30 minutes he had searched through Hamlet and found the
references he needed to begin his assignment and left the computer room with
his print-out in hand. This program contains some advanced routines that will
take most users some time to master, but its primary use as a way to search
through the text and locate words is a task that most can master at one
sitting.

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