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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: January ::
Rs: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 10.  Wednesday, 6 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Jan 93 12:46:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0007  Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
 
(2)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Wednesday, January 6, 1993
        Subj:   RSC *Two Gentlemen*
 
(3)     From:   Jay L Halio <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Jan 1993 13:51:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0007 Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Jan 93 12:46:23 -0500
Subject: 4.0007  Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0007  Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
 
>Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 7.  Wednesday, 6 January 1993.
>
>From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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>Date:           Wednesday, 6 Jan 1993 12:54:09 +1300
>Subject:        TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA
>
>I am curently directing a production of _The Two Gentlemen of Verona_
>outdoors in Wellington, New Zealand (which to anybody who knows the climate
>in Wellington might seem foolhardy, but this is the 11th consecutive annual
>production and the weather hasn't been too much of a problem so far). I'd
>be interested in hearing any ideas anyone has on the play, and any
>references to any little-known published material would also be helpful.
>Jonathan Goldberg's work in _Voice Terminal Echo_ has been useful to us so
>far.
 
 
I dont know if this really counts as "little known," but you might want to
look at the Appendix to Robert Weimann's "Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition
in the Theater" which has some useful remarks on Launce and his relation to the
audience. Good luck with the weather.
 
 
--
Tom Bishop
Dept of English
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, OH 44106.  (
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(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Wednesday, January 6, 1993
Subject:        RSC *Two Gentlemen*
 
Robert Smallwood reviews David Thacker's "irresistible production" of *The Two
Gentlemen of Verona* for the RSC at the Swan Theatre in the Fall 1992 *SQ*
(43.4: 350-353).  Smallwood maintains that "Setting the play in the 1930s,
with an eight-piece band and singer upstage throughout the performance, Tacker
achieved what seemed to me a legitimate and revealing relationship between
social and verbal elegance and moral shallowness of the play's characters, and
the same qualities in his chosen period."  Smallwood thoroughly approved of
Thacker's treatment as his concluding remarks reveal:
 
          In the silence that followed his [Proteus's] quiet and deliberate
          speech -- "I do as truly suffer / As e'er I did commit" -- one was
          aware of Sylvia looking very hard at Valentine, willing him to
          accept this apology; after that moment of understanding between
          them she moved across to the kneeling Proteus and put her arm
          round his shoulder, the first to forgive him.  The notorious "All
          that was mine in Sylvia I give thee" thus came to mean something
          like "the mutual love and trust between Sylvia and me is something
          in which you can now share," and even as we were taking this in,
          Julia collapsed and we were into the mechanical unwinding of the
          plot that concludes the play.  It was a daring and in many ways
          brilliant solution to what has so often been regarded, on the
          page, as an intractable problem; from seeming to many readers
          merely a property, a chattel, in the scene, the silent Sylvia was
          made its motor, and comic form was thus preserved.  One could
          argue, of course, that from the character being the chattel of the
          dramatist's chauvinist vision the actress had become chattel of
          the director's sentimental invention, but that would be another
          essay.  The scene made sense as directed, and Shakespeare's so-
          called failure, his apprentice work, his unplayable flop, became
          the hit of the season.
 
I hope this helps.
 
Hardy M. Cook

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(3)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jay L Halio <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Jan 1993 13:51:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0007 Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0007 Q: *Two Gentlemen of Verona*
 
I saw the RSC performance at the Swan a couple of years ago (if that is
the one referred to as a "Brideshead Revisited" setting), and it worked
fine with torch songs sung between each act! See reviews and especially
Tom Clayton's excellent analysis of the ending in *Shakespeare Bulletin*
last year.
 
Jay Halio
 

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