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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: January ::
Re: "To be"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 27.  Saturday, 16 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Nikki Parker <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Jan 1993 09:07:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Rs: Marriage Quotations; Theobald's Rowe; "To be"
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Bowden <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Jan 93 06:19:08 PST
        Subj:   Re: Rs: Marriage Quotations; Theobald's Rowe; "To be
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nikki Parker <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Jan 1993 09:07:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Rs: Marriage Quotations; Theobald's Rowe; "To be"
 
In Hamlet's "to be or not to be", I'm inclined to think that is the *thought*
of suicide, but then the pondering of the possibilities of what goes on after
death..."aye, there's the rub" seems to be the turning point where Hamlet sees
that no one knows what happens after one dies, and it could be worse than life
itself.  All in all, I find it a wonderful monologue.
 
Nikki Parker
St. Michael's College
Colchester, VT
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Jan 93 06:19:08 PST
Subject:        Re: Rs: Marriage Quotations; Theobald's Rowe; "To be
 
> From:           Kay Stockholder <
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> I'm puzzled about thinking of "To be or not to be" as either about
> suicide or the love of life. Isn't it about both? I mean, isn't it about
> the fear of taking suicidal action, in view of the sweetness of life?
 
How can `the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune' be sweet?  And, if
they are, why contemplate suicide at all?  It was fear of the unknown,
that `undiscovered country', which stayed his hand to Act V.
 
I think it was clear our boy Hamlet was by no means a happy camper, and
what's more he says so quite clearly and often.  Manic depression seems
the best diagnosis I've read, though reams of paper have been devoted to
the topic...
 
-Tim's Timid Topic Template
 
 
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 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  (Timothy Bowden)
uunet!scruz.ucsc.edu!clovis.felton.ca.us!tcbowden
Clovis in Felton, CA
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