1993

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 34.  Wednesday, 20 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 17:54:10 EST
        Subj:   SHK 4.0032  "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
 
(2)     From:   Hope Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Jan 1993 09:12:24 -500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0032 "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 17:54:10 EST
Subject: "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
Comment:        SHK 4.0032  "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
 
Regarding Timothy Pinnow's comment on Hamlet's question on how to "act" (in the
"To be or not..." passage), I recall being shocked by the Richard Chamberlain
production of Hamlet, in which the director made it obvious that Polonius and
Claudius were overhearing Hamlet's soliloquy and that Hamlet became aware of
their presence during the course of the speech. It changes the nature and
import of the speech dramatically.
 
I've always wondered if there was anything in the acting tradition to support
this presentation of such a central speech. If Hamlet is not "speaking alone,"
the speech's meaning is very different!
 
          Ron Dwelle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) GVSU, Allendale, MI
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hope Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Jan 1993 09:12:24 -500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0032 "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0032 "To be or not to be"; Melancholy
 
Re: Melancholia:
 
Has anyone ever made a connection between melancholy as an upper class
disease and sugar as a staple (or as a new and exciting oft-served main
course) of the upper class diet?
 
H Greenberg, another north-country inhabitant (Hi Nikki)
University of Vermont, Burlington

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