1993

Folger Library Awarded $2.5 Million Grant

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 33.  Wednesday, 20 January 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, January 20, 1993
Subject:        Folger Library Grant
 
 
FOLGER LIBRARY NEWS RELEASE
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 13, 1993
 
CONTACT:        Janet A. Griffin (202) 675-0343
                Bruce Trachtenberg (212) 9S3-1200
                Jerry Tyson (202) 466-8222
 
FOLGER LIBRARY AWARDED $2.5 MILLION GRANT
 
Plans to Expand Public Programming
 
WASHINGTON, DC--The Folger Shakespeare Library announced today receipt of a
$2.5 million grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund for "Project
Access" to expand public programming. This is the largest award received by
the library since its founding 60 years ago.
 
M. Christine DeVita, president of the Fund, said "Project Access will make it
possible for the Folger Shakespeare Library to substantially improve the way
it presents its collections and offer new educational and outreach programs.
This will enable the library to develop fully its role as a public cultural
institution."
 
Funds for Project Access will be used to:
 
        o refurbish and upgrade the Folger's 250-seat Elizabethan Theatre
 
        o create a full schedule of varied cultural programs for the Theatre
 
        o create an expanded museum program with new exhibit spaces and
          a multilingual, interactive video center for programs on
          Shakespeare and his age
 
        o increase the number of public humanities programs and
          interpretative exhibitions which highlight the library's
          extensive collection of books, manuscripts, and artifacts
 
        o improve access to the building, its public spaces, and its
          programs for people with disabilities
 
        o enable the Folger's programs and exhibitions to reflect the
          diversity of the community
 
According to Folger Director Werner Gundersheimer, Project Access is an
integral part of the library's Jubilee Campaign, announced on its 60th
anniversary last year with an overall goal of $20 million. Jubilee Campaign
funds will enhance core collections, support operating costs, and improve
scholarly and public access to the library's resources.
 
One of a handful of private research libraries in this country originally
established to support advanced research, the Folger, according to
Gundersheimer, "has always explored new ways to make the cultural legacy
of the Renaissance meaningful to everyone, and this new grant will help
us intensify our efforts."
 
Project Access has been initiated with seed funding from the Marpat
Foundation of Washington, DC.
 
To help create a vibrant and thriving cultural life that adds vitality to
our nation and provides enriching experiences for people across the country,
the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund supports programs in performing, visual,
literary, and folk arts; adult literacy, and urban parks. With annual grants
of more than $30 million, the Fund is the largest private funder of art and
culture in the United States.

"To be or not to be"; Melancholy

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 32.  Tuesday, 19 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Timothy Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 12:30:14 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
(2)     From:   Nikki Parker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 13:42:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
(3)     From:   Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 13:16:47 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Melancholy
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 12:30:14 CST
Subject: 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
I find Anthony Teague's argument quite interesting.  One of the problems
actors have always found with playing Hamlet is that it is just darn hard
to play something as passive as melancholia or indecisiveness for four and
a half hours and have an audience bother listening.  I agree that Hamlet
really isn't talking about suicide--he goes to awfully great lengths to
figure out his situation.  That doesn't sound to me like someone who is so
depressed that he is ready to give up on life.  Nor do I think that a
tragic hero in the definitional sense can be prone to giving up--we would
lose the blind passion that inevitably creates the tragic flaw.  What I
would suggest is that Hamlet is not wondering whether to live or die, or
whether to act or not, but HOW to act effectively.  And I use the word
"act" in its fullest theatrical sense.  What if Hamlet realized he was
being watched?  Could this not then be an instance of "putting an antic
disposition on"?  We also have the advice to the players to suggest that
Hamlet realizes the uses of good acting,  Hamlet as feigned melodrama in
"to be or not to be" would certainly seem plausible to me.  And, it is
eminently more playable for the actor.  Those who wish to delve into this
idea further may wish to consult David Ball's *Backwards and Forwards*  So.
Ill. Univ. Press. or my own article "Towards a new Hamlet:breathing new
life into an old character" In *Text and Presentation* vol. 11, 1991.
 
Timothy Pinnow
St. Olaf College
Northfield MN
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nikki Parker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 13:42:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0030  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
To all,
 
Just wanted to say how impressed and enlightened I have been from the
"To be or not to be" discussion, I think it would be benificial if students
in high school got this kind of information! I blush to remember how long it
first took me to realize that "wherefore" meant "why" and not "where" in
*Romeo & Juliet*
 
Warm wishes from a cold state! (must be at least 10 degrees today!)
 
Nikki Parker
St. Michael's College
Colchester, Vermont
"Aye, tis not what seems..." -Hamlet
 
(3)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 13:16:47 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Melancholy
 
A few further thoughts on the Renaissance conception of melancholy:
 
Yes, it was a disease, with specific symptoms and cures.  And yes, it
was regarded as the particular province of the upper classes.  There's
a wonderful short scene in one of Lyly's plays in which a
working-class character claims to be melancholic, but is roundly
chewed out by a servant: working class people have the rheum, or
catarrh, etc.; nobles have melancholy.  I can look up the reference (I
think it's either _Gallathea_ or _Midas_) if anyone's interested.  A
modern parallel might be the term "eccentric", which tends to be
applied to rich folk; poor people who behave the same way are just
weird.
 
Also, there were a number of forms of melancholy.  The most common was
love melancholy, and male lovers were *expected* to show the symptoms:
dishevelment, lack of focus, loss of appetite, etc.  Shakespeare's
comedies abound with examples, Orlando being the one that
comes most readily to my mind at the moment.
 
On the other hand, there was also a more pathological form, which
generally manifested itself as jealousy or envy.  This form shows up
more often in the tragedies and histories (the Richards, for example).
In between is the sort of mainstream version, the one which afflicts
Hamlet (or, depending on the interpretation, which Hamlet affects).
 
There have been a couple of quite good books on the subject of
melancholy -- I don't have the references handy, but could look them
up pretty quickly if anyone is interested.
 
Rick Jones
Cornell College
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

"To be or not to be" (con't)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 30.  Tuesday, 19 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Anthony Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Jan 93 10:34:26 00900
        Subj:   To be or not to be
 
(2)     From:   Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Jan 93 10:58
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0029  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Jan 93 10:34:26 00900
Subject:        To be or not to be
 
I have always found the long note starting on page 484 of Harold Jenkins's
Arden edition of "Hamlet" to be very helpful in getting students (and self)
away from a too suicidal reading of the speech. Recalling that "the question"
has a technical sense as the topic for discussion in an academic 'disputacio'
helps, because in such debates there could be no right and wrong answers, only
the quotation of authorities to support various responses. Jenkins also helps
by reminding me that "To be or not to be" is a recognized abreviation of the
full topic "Whether it be better to be alive though unhappy, or to be dead."
I feel that the necessarily inconclusive nature of the debate is the main
dramatic point (conscience making cowards of us all) because the speech is a
dramatic representation of one of the play's main themes, the one about the
way thinking makes life more complicated, while action devoid of thought makes
beasts of us. "To think, or not to think?" There is no particular reason why
the speech should represent a suicidal crisis, given the point in the play at
which it comes. That it also reminds us and Hamlet that death is down the road
waiting, whatever we do, is sure. I tend to tell my students that the speech
is basically directed towards the question of "What to do, since suicide is
not an option" and I suspect that it could equally well be paraphrased as "To
act or not to act"!
 
Anthony Teague, Sogang University, Seoul Korea
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Jan 93 10:58
Subject: 4.0029  "To be or not to be" (con't)
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0029  "To be or not to be" (con't)
 
From Luc Borot <eli16@frmop22>
 
On: T Bowden's view on Renaissance melancholy
 
     Dear all,
 
In the debate on "to be or not to be", I wonder if I got T. Bowden's opinion
right. The point made seems to be that Melancholy was a pastime for the
genteel. This is what we may think with hindsight, but the belief was that it
was indeed a genuine disease, for which there were cures. As for Burton, he
seems to look upon melancholy as a social threat (sometimes an ontological
threat) for which social and medical cures must be found (there is a utopia in
Democritus Junior's prologue).
 
We are not 'better' because 'more advanced' than Elizabethans, high ly
civilized creatures themselves, and we do not 'better' know what they saw than
they did.
 
The text we deal with is so full of things from those times that the debate so
far has been a trifle lightish, I'm afraid.
 
    Cheers to all, and please BE...
 
                Luc

Rs: Theobald's Rowe; Marriage Quotations

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 31.  Tuesday, 19 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 09:37 EDT
        Subj:   THEOBALD AND ROWE
 
(2)     From:   Zanne Westfall Pardee <WS#This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 14:06:22 EDT
        Subj:   more marriages [quotations]
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 1993 09:37 EDT
Subject:        THEOBALD AND ROWE
 
Dear Professor Seary,
 
Thanks for your references.  I wonder if Theobald did anything more than list
the Rowe. Is there any proof that he held the books in his hands, examined
them, read them thoroughly?  I know how difficult it was in the early 18th
century to get books and while Theobald may have known of Rowe and even used
Rowe indirectly through Pope, I wonder if he ever really looked at the text
carefully.  Any ideas?  I will certainly look at your book again, which I read
about a year ago with great pleasure.  I agree with you that Theobald did some
magnificent work that has been dismissed and belittled.  The whole issue on
competition interests me very much.
 
All the best,
 
Bernice W. Kliman
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Zanne Westfall Pardee <WS#This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Jan 93 14:06:22 EDT
Subject:        more marriages [quotations]
 
*As You Like It* 3.3 is rich with goodies.  My personal favorite (for my
wedding actually) is Touchstone's "Come, sweet Audrey: We must be
married, or we must live in bawdry." Cheers.
 
Suzanne Westfall ws#This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

"To be or not to be" (con't)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 29.  Sunday, 17 January 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Kay Stockholder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Jan 93 15:30:34 PST
        Subj:   SHK 4.0027  Re: "To be"
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Jan 93 15:22:36 PST
        Subj:   Re: More on "To be or not to be
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kay Stockholder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Jan 93 15:30:34 PST
Subject: Re: "To be"
Comment:        SHK 4.0027  Re: "To be"
 
During that soliloquy he thinks of life as painful, but when he contemplates
Fortinbras' army he reflects on the worthlessness of the cause for which so
many risk their lives, and blames himself for cowardice. The entire play can be
seen as a process by bringing himself to accept death, a process that
culminates when he both contemplates and smells Yorick's skull. He's clearly
depressed, but even depressed people have to contend with the sweetness of life
[as asserted by Edgar].
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Jan 93 15:22:36 PST
Subject:        Re: More on "To be or not to be
 
> From:           Barbara Fister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 
> As for diagnosing Hamlet's condition, some of my best friends are
> manic depressive; I don't believe for a moment he is.  (Claudius would
> agree--"his speech, tho' it lacked form a little, was not like madness")
 
I think maybe psychiatrists are overrated;  we could do as well right
here.  For instance, Claudius was looking for thought disorder, which we
might call schizophrenia and which Hamlet only feigned, as did
Gloucester's kid Edmund in _Lear_, and did not contemplate melancholia,
which was I think considered more a pastime of the serious man than a
disability anyway (Antonio opens _Merchant of Venice_ musing on it and
one cloistered cleric of the era wrote a classic treatise on the subject
or something like it called _Anatomy of Melancholy_).
 
A working hypothesis of our local psych counseling guild is that
subjects who inertly brood on dark topics and break off promising
romances (Hamlet as Woody Allen?) and go about running their rapiers
into any old arras and end up wrestling with rivals in open graves and
proclaiming loudly to skulls should routinely be treated with librium.
I can't tell you how many we've helped that way.
 
                If this be error, and 'pon me proved
                I never pushed it, lest I was shoved
 
-Tremonius
 
=========================================================
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Timothy Bowden)
uunet!scruz.ucsc.edu!clovis.felton.ca.us!tcbowden
Clovis in Felton, CA
=========================================================

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