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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: February ::
More Rs: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 59.  Wednesday, 3 February 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Constance C. Relihan <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Feb 1993 07:28 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
(2)     From:   NAOMI LIEBLER <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Feb 93 09:52:00 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
(3)     From:   Bernice Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
        Date:   Wednesday, 3 Feb 1993 14:48 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Constance C. Relihan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Feb 1993 07:28 CST
Subject: 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
Re. Birth Defects
 
There's a short ballad printed in *Ballads and Broadsides*, chiefly of the
Elizabethan Period (ed. H.L. Collmann) on "The True Fourme and Shape of a
Monsterous Chyld" which may be of interest. The child in question appears
to have been actually a pair of Siamese twins who died within a few hours
of their birth in 1565. The cause of the defect seems to be ascribed to the
fact that its parents were unmarried and the strength of God's power.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           NAOMI LIEBLER <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Feb 93 09:52:00 EST
Subject: 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
Re: Ed Pechter's (offhand?) speculation: "Having brought together two unrelated
interests in the possibility of performance criticism and sexual acts, I
wonder about the possibility of the theatrical performance of sexual acts."
 
Ed, you may have been lucky enough to miss Joanne Akalaitis's productions of 1
and 2 Henry IV a few years back at the New York Shakespeare Festival's Public
Theater, where the dominant stage image in 1H4 involved a great deal of
simulated fucking during the tavern scenes (the parallel stage metaphor of 2H4
was the dysenteric evacuation of the tavern's residents). Taken together, the
audience was treated to enough vicarious fornication/defecation to satisfy even
the most pathologically voyeuristic. The point is that SOMEONE (not yours
truly; I paid good money to see this stuff) must have reviewed these
productions, and perhaps successfully bent his or her mind around "the
possibility of the theatrical performance of sexual acts." If you really want
to pursue this critical direction, *Shakespeare Bulletin* (inter alia)
doubtless had a review.
 
Happy hunting.
Naomi Liebler
 
(3)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
Date:           Wednesday, 3 Feb 1993 14:48 EDT
Subject: 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0058  Re: Birth Defects; Performance Criticism
 
Thanks Steve for your references.  I'd like to add an essay by Michael Goldman
in Theatre Journal 44 (1992) 449-60, "Hamlet: Entering the Text." It's a
wonderful essay on the actor's commitment to the script and the choices
possible.  Steve, he mentions you.
 
And, with all due modesty, may I mention my own new book on Macbeth for the
Manchester UP?  It came out at the very end of 1992, but I just got my copies a
few days ago.  What I love best about performance criticism is the way what I
do in the classroom is connected to what I do in my study, in the library, in
the theater, and at my computer.  I'm into FUN these days.
 
All the best
Bernice
 

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