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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: February ::
Assorted Rs Re: Performance Criticism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 73.  Wednesday, 10 February 1993.
 
(1)     From:   David Richman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Feb 1993 10:35:26 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
 
(2)     From:   Kay Stockholder <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 08:21:08 PST
        Subj:   SHK 4.0068  Performance Criticism
 
(3)     From:   NAOMI LIEBLER <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 09:47:00 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0072  Sex Acts and Performance Criticism
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Richman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Feb 1993 10:35:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
 
David Bank's delicious story supports, and refutes, all sides in this dust-up.
 
All criticism, in all modes, is impossible, if one is responding to enormous
inadequacies and imperfections.  We have a meagre body of fact, and imperfect
tools.  (By "we" I mean all those who try to respond with spoken or written
words to other people's spoken or written words.  We are all trying to lift
up Olympus, or roll the ceaseless stone.  The alternative is to fall silent.
 
Why one set of people, trying to do the impossible, wants to throw nasturtiums
at another set of people, also trying to do the impossible, continues to
baffle me.
 
Cheers,
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kay Stockholder <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 08:21:08 PST
Subject: Performance Criticism
Comment:        SHK 4.0068  Performance Criticism
 
If what you have described is performance criticism, it is hardly impossible,
but is rather a slightly different version of trying out ideas. It is no
different from having an idea about the significance of a scene, such as the
opening one of Hamlet, and then seeing how that version of it fits in with
one's idea of the rest of the play. And of course any idea about the scene,
whether articulated in terms of one's imagination of its performance, or of
critical articles about it is related to what aspect of the reality we know we
find represented in it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           NAOMI LIEBLER <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 09:47:00 EST
Subject: 4.0072  Sex Acts and Performance Criticism
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0072  Sex Acts and Performance Criticism
 
To Cliff Ronan:
 
Re: whether Barry Kyle's staging of *Measure* influenced Akalaitis's production
of *1H4*--I have no clue. If your recollection of a 1978 date for the
performance you saw is correct, chances are that it didn't. The Akalaitis thing
happened sometime within the last 2 years. There wasn't much nudity in the
latter event: the image received suggested (to me at least) that Quickly's
tenants were too hurried, or perhaps too ill, or perhaps too bored, to bother
removing their clothes altogether. Only the necessary apparata. You get the
point. In any case, the audience watched a simulation, not necessarily a
stimulation. As Steve Urkowitz would say--and HAS said--Go know. Perhaps
someone who is more of a performa than I can elevate this event to some
intelligent critical interpretation. I thought it was just tacky--memorable,
but tacky. Made me want to run home and take a bath, and perhaps some
precautionary penicillin as well.
 
On that lovely note--best wishes,
Naomi Liebler
 

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