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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: February ::
Re: Performance Criticism Issues
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 74.  Thursday, 11 February 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Bernice Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Feb 1993 19:15 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0073  Assorted Rs Re: Performance Criticism
 
(2)     From:   Steven Urkowitz <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 23:22:31 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.bitnet>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Feb 1993 19:15 EDT
Subject: 4.0073  Assorted Rs Re: Performance Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0073  Assorted Rs Re: Performance Criticism
 
Without the nudity, the television version of MM, 1979, had a brothel scene out
of the wild west, as I am sure everyone recalls. Nudity -- no.
 
David Richman says it so well that I think I'd like to quote him again: Why one
set of people, trying to do the impossible, wants to throw nasturtiums at
another set of people, also trying to do the impossible, continues to baffle
me, says David.  Me too.
 
Cheers,
 
Bernice
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Urkowitz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Feb 93 23:22:31 EST
Subject: 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0071  Re: Impossibility of Performance Criticism
 
For David Banks and the differences between performance criticism and
performance research:
 
Yes, yes, yes.  The protocols of empiric research are vastly different from the
self-consciously individualistic interpretive acts described by theatre
historians or script readers or folks who interview actors or decipher the
annotations of stage managers or directors.  For a while in the 1970s I used to
read through American journals from various "speech" organizations; some gave
results of close surveys of audience responses in performances.  Unexpected
spectra, inexplicable null responses, swarths of data and charts.  But we need
not grant sole title to "performance criticism" to them.  Need we?  (Or as we
said in the bars in the Bronx, "Do we gotta?")
 
Thanks for bringing in the gamesome dimension of how we define and use data and
nomenclature.
                                Steve (shut-up-already) Urkowitz
                                SURCC@CUNYVM
 

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