Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: December ::
Re: Electronic Scholarship and Texts
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 872. Wednesday, 1 December 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Hope A. Greenberg <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1993 09:29:20 -500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0857 Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1993 23:03:56 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0865  Re: Electronic Scholarship and Texts
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hope A. Greenberg <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1993 09:29:20 -500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0857 Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0857 Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
It would be surprising if many scholars didn't have the "passion for
books" as B.G. so emotionally describes it. The tactile pleasures of a
solid tome, the joy of the physical act of reading, the pride in a fine
collection are shared by many people. However, this passion is in no way
threatened (at least not in our lifetime) by the availability of
electronic texts. I must agree with John Lavagnino (Hi, John!). Diatribes
against electronic text do not advance the scholarly cause. Devising
creative ways to make literature and history come alive for students
through the use of electronic texts seems like a much worthier way to
spend one's time and energy.
 
While I have often felt, like one of C.S.Lewis characters when he says
"Progress? Development? I have seen them both in the egg. We
call it going bad..." I still cannot completely decry recent developments
in computing. They're finally getting useful for humanities scholars!
 
Hope Greenberg
Academic Computing
Univ. of Vermont
Burlington, VT 05490
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1993 23:03:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0865  Re: Electronic Scholarship and Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0865  Re: Electronic Scholarship and Texts
 
To Kevin Berland and Jim McKenna:
 
Yes, you both caution us wisely. This thing that I'm using is merely a tool,
but the great electronic highway may very well lead to information gridlock. In
fact, don't we all have colleagues who get so much e-mail per day that they
can't read it? It just gets deleted.
 
And, Kevin, are you noticing a decline in reading skill among your students? I
know it's hard to judge precisely, but yesterday I asked my undergraduate
Shakespeare class to paraphrase and/or explain the first lines of TWELFTH
NIGHT. Out of twenty-four students, three seemed to understand what was going
on and to see the problems of paraphrasing.
 
Obviously, twenty-four is not a large sample, but from listening to my students
talk, it seems as if they spend more time watching TV than they do reading
books. Nevertheless, I don't know where the problem lies.
 
Does anyone have any good methods of teaching college students how to read
Shakespeare?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.