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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: December ::
Re: Reading, Teaching, and Seeing Shakespeare
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 901.  Monday, 6 December 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Daniel F. Pigg <IVAD%
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        Date:   Sunday, 05 Dec 93 17:46:46 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0899 Re: Teaching and Reading and Seeing Shakespeare
 
(2)     From:   Paul Austin <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Dec 93 07:32:10 EST
        Subj:   Reformatting Shakespeare into prose text.
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel F. Pigg <IVAD%
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Date:           Sunday, 05 Dec 93 17:46:46 CST
Subject: 4.0899 Re: Teaching and Reading and Seeing Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0899 Re: Teaching and Reading and Seeing Shakespeare
 
Tom, It seems to me there is much merit in what you say regarding the
reading vs. viewing of Shakespeare--a distinction that could be extended
to all drama for that matter.  As a semiotician, I am always in a
difficult position of this topic.  Without question Shakespeare wrote
directly for the stage, but recovering exactly what the experience of
drama in the 16th or early 17th c was like is impossible.  Every
performance would differ just as modern productions do.   I think
the nature of performance variance has made text study recieve
greater importance, not least becauce we have at least some ground for
comparison and stability.  In addition, some of the problem lies in who
is doing the study.  Most literary scholars give the printed text
primacy, whereas theatre scholars reverse trends.  This is certainly a
generalization I realize.  The question of how much of the work of an
author is recoverable to a late twentieth-century audience is primary.
I think we must face the fact thatregardless of what many of the critics
of the eighteenth and nineteenth century say much of the Bard in not
recoverable; yet I don't think we should dispair, simply see the play.
Performance tells us more about the true nature of the play.
 
Daniel Pigg
Department of English
University of Tennessee at Martin
IVAD@UTMARTN.BITNET
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Austin <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Dec 93 07:32:10 EST
Subject:        Reformatting Shakespeare into prose text.
 
I read a translation of Homer this way and it helped immensely. But
I have not read it in verse to know if I am lacking in understading
of the work.
 
Paul Austin
 

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