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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: December ::
The Human Condition (Was Subjectivity in *Hamlet*)
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 935.  Tuesday, 14 December 1993.
 
(1)     From:   John Cox <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Dec 1993 12:51:35 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Chris Kendall <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Dec 1993 13:14:15 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   The Human Condition
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 12:51:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
 
I appreciate Ken Rothwell's support of my comment about reading subjectivity
in *Hamlet* backwards as well as forwards, but with all due respect, my point
is not that "the human condition remains the same," because I'm not at all
sure that it does.  My point is simply that we can enrich our reading of
archaic texts if we consider what lay behind them, as well what lies in front
of them, so to speak, which is inevitably more familiar to us, because we
are closer to it.
 
John Cox
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Kendall <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 13:14:15 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        The Human Condition
 
>Ways of talking about the human condition are constantly
>changing but the human condition remains the same. If more of us kept this
>in  mind, there would be less confusion in Shakespeare studies.
>Ken Rothwell
 
Do I hear another Shakespeare and Politics discussion brewing?  Hardy will
be calling me a trouble-maker, but this is one outstanding question from
that donnybrook that still fascinates me, and I'm sitting on the fence.
If there is only one eternal human condition then it would seem that
politics is merely a reductive process of clarifying and accomodating that
condition.  Certainly Shakespeare clarified the human condition, but if I
heard Jim McKenna right it was not precisely our condition, but his own.
 
--
Chris Kendall                 | 
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