1993

Re: Paraphrase (Was Pronouns)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 958. Saturday, 18 December 1993.
 
From:           James Scaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Dec 1993 11:37:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0952  Re: Pronoun Use; Paraphrase; and CD-ROM Discs
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0952  Re: Pronoun Use; Paraphrase; and CD-ROM Discs
 
Reply to Nate Johnson:
 
Speaking, of course, only for myself:  I am against paraphrase because
the language of the play IS the play.  The play of words both contains
and reveals the interplay of the characters.  It is all the playwright
has to guide us toward our reconstruction of the human (inter-)action
he or she is attempting to imitate.  At the same time, it is the
playwright's only _constraint_ on us, the only means available to keep
us from running wild with our own ideas and running roughshod (think
about what that metaphor means, literally!) through the world the
author is trying to create.  This same principle applies even to
translated works:  we rely on the translator to find ways of
embedding in a text written in our language the social nuances
embedded in the foreign-language text.
 
All our interpretations will, of course, be different, influenced by
our own experience, training, etc.  But this is why I like the Peter
Brook approach I commended in an earlier note:  If you're going to
begin with a sketch of the scene, make it a sketch in the author's
own words.
 
Paraphrase is as useless as arguing motivations.  The language is
unfamiliar, but total immersion should be a source of excitement.
As Olivier said:
 
        I'd rather have run the scene eight times than have wasted
        that time in chattering away about abstractions.  An actor
        gets the right thing by doing it over and over.  (from
        *Directors on Directing*)
 
And that means saying the words over and over until the action they
contain becomes apparent.  The applies to silent readers as well.
 
Jim Schaefer
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More Spinoffs

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 957. Saturday, 18 December 1993.
 
From:           Douglas Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Dec 1993 14:25:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        More suggestions for the SPINOFF list
 
Dear Hardy,
 
In an effort to prevent you from grading, let me suggest two more additions to
the marvelous SPINOFF list:
 
Under Much Ado:
Hector Berlioz, *Beatrice and Benedick* Opera
 
Under Midsummer:
Henry Purcell, *The Fairy Queen*, Opera
 
Actually, there are several other operatic possibilities that might be added,
if you are interested in completeness and not quality!!
 
Many thanks for the updated bibliography, and happy holidays.
 
Douglas Lanier
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Re: Shakespearean Daughters

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 955.  Friday, 17 December 1993.
 
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Dec 1993 10:39:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0938 Re: Shakespearean Daughters
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0938 Re: Shakespearean Daughters
 
> Dear Helen Ostovich: Do you mean that you think Nedar is Helena's FATHER?
>
> Terence Hawkes.
 
Yes, as a matter of fact, I always assumed old Nedar was the father.  Why
not?  It seems to me that unless a character refers to someone as a
widow's daughter (like Diana in AWW) then the assumption is always that
the parent is a male.  Juliet is Capulet's daughter.  Even though her
mother is alive, no one assumes that Capulet is the mother.
 
Helen Ostovich

Re: The Human Condition

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 956. Saturday, 18 December 1993.
 
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Dec 1993 13:03:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0953  Re: The Human Condition
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0953  Re: The Human Condition
 
For those of us who believe that mortality defines the human condition, as
Al Cacicedo suggests, I offer the following anecdote.
 
I was recently discussing the rudiments of logical argumentation with my
first-year composition class.  I pointed out that the limitation of induc-
tive reasoning is the necessity for the inductive leap:  even "the sun will
rise tomorrow" is subject to the reservation that we haven't actually seen
it rise yet.  Turning to deductive reasoning, I pointed out that no "leaps"
are necessary in a well-constructed syllogism, but that if the syllogism is
to have some application to real life, then the premises have to be true to
life.  As an example, I used the traditional syllogism that begins, "All
people are mortal."  When I explained the example, one attentive student
raised her hand to object that the major premise in that syllogism involves
an inductive leap:  though we know of no exceptions to the rule stated by
the premise, those who are alive have not yet died, so the same reservation
applies to the syllogism as to the inductive inference that the sun will
rise tomorrow.  I wish my student had been in Aristotle's class when he
expounded the syllogism.
 
John Cox

Another Spinoff

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 954.  Friday, 17 December 1993.
 
From:           Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Dec 93 07:09:01 EST
Subject: 4.0951  SPINOFF BIBLIO and CHARACTR BIBLIO Updated
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0951  SPINOFF BIBLIO and CHARACTR BIBLIO Updated
 
For the Spinoff list, Stephen Leacock, "Saloonio," from an anthology of his
writings LITERARY LAPSES (1904?), a delicious invention of a bluff old guy who
has  his favorite character, Saloonio, who has been left out of most modern
editions because of his racy language.
 
Steve Urkowitz

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