1993

Re: Shakespearean Daughters

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 938.  Wednesday, 15 Dec. 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Dec 93 16:06 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0937 Re: Shakespearean Daughters
 
(2)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Dec 93 21:02:31 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0937  Re: Shakespearean Daughters
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Dec 93 16:06 BST
Subject: 4.0937 Re: Shakespearean Daughters
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0937 Re: Shakespearean Daughters
 
Dear Helen Ostovich: Do you mean that you think Nedar is Helena's FATHER?
 
Terence Hawkes.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Dec 93 21:02:31 EST
Subject: 4.0937  Re: Shakespearean Daughters
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0937  Re: Shakespearean Daughters
 
Have we mentioned Diana in ALL'S WELL and her mom, "an old widow of Florence"?
A former student of mine, Patrice Johnson, played Diana in Central Park last
summer, and suddenly we saw that Diana was one of the magically transforming
and commanding figures in the play.
 
                               Steve Urkowitz
                               City College of New York
                               SURCC@CUNYVM

Re: Shakespearean Daughters

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 937.  Tuesday, 14 December 1993.
 
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 23:09:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0917 Re: Shakespearean Daughters (Was Jessica)
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0917 Re: Shakespearean Daughters (Was Jessica)
 
Thanks for those daughters with mothers.  I've also recalled Marina.  But
Marina, like Perdita, can't really be said to have grown up under her
mother's influence.  Princess Katherine and her mother do not have a
speaking relationship either, although the mother-daughter thing is there.
Mistress Page and Diana seem to be the only products of a close family
relationship.  (I don't buy the story about Nedar being Helena's mother.
I can't share the myth of Hero's mother either.  If she doesn't say
anything, and no one talks about her or to her, and she's not on the
Dramatis Personae, then she's just not there, I'm afraid.)
 
Helen Ostovich

The Human Condition (Was Subjectivity in *Hamlet*)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 935.  Tuesday, 14 December 1993.
 
(1)     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Dec 1993 12:51:35 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Chris Kendall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Dec 1993 13:14:15 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   The Human Condition
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 12:51:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0930  Re: Subjectivity in *Hamlet*
 
I appreciate Ken Rothwell's support of my comment about reading subjectivity
in *Hamlet* backwards as well as forwards, but with all due respect, my point
is not that "the human condition remains the same," because I'm not at all
sure that it does.  My point is simply that we can enrich our reading of
archaic texts if we consider what lay behind them, as well what lies in front
of them, so to speak, which is inevitably more familiar to us, because we
are closer to it.
 
John Cox
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Kendall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 13:14:15 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        The Human Condition
 
>Ways of talking about the human condition are constantly
>changing but the human condition remains the same. If more of us kept this
>in  mind, there would be less confusion in Shakespeare studies.
>Ken Rothwell
 
Do I hear another Shakespeare and Politics discussion brewing?  Hardy will
be calling me a trouble-maker, but this is one outstanding question from
that donnybrook that still fascinates me, and I'm sitting on the fence.
If there is only one eternal human condition then it would seem that
politics is merely a reductive process of clarifying and accomodating that
condition.  Certainly Shakespeare clarified the human condition, but if I
heard Jim McKenna right it was not precisely our condition, but his own.
 
--
Chris Kendall                 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

You/Thou in Shakespeare's Work

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 936.  Tuesday, 14 December 1993.
 
From:           John Massa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 93 14:23 CST
Subject:        "you" vs. "thou" in Shakespeare's work
 
Could someone give me a good reference for the use of "you" vs. "thou" in
Shakespeare?  So far, it seems that the following usages hold for most
situations in Shakespeare's works:
 
          YOU:
          (1) from inferior to superior
          (2) to someone not well known
 
          THOU:
          (1) from superior to inferior
          (2) between intimate acquaintences
          (3) to express strong emotions (regardless of social
              relationships ??)
 
These rules (which I have pieced together from various sources) seem to work,
but there are exceptions, and I am not sure if something is being lost in the
amalgamation.
 
Does anyone know of a good treatment of this issue for Shakespeare's works and
times?
 
Any other comments about the significance of "you/thou" ?
 
John Massa
University of Iowa
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Verse Speaking

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 934.  Tuesday, 14 December 1993.
 
From:           Sharon Cinnamon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Dec 1993 12:53:11 -0100
Subject: 4.0920  Q: Verse Speaking
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0920  Q: Verse Speaking
 
A good book for teaching actors to speak Shakespeare's verse or prose is
Kristin Linklater's "Freeing Shakespeare's Voice".  I will admit, much of
it is based on her voice work which is somewhat difficult to lift off the
page without a voice teacher.  I do think, though, that a teacher/director
who is not familiar with her techniques could still find a lot of use in
the exercises described in the book.  The sections on the structure of the
verse and the explanations of the many uses of different types of word play
are also very helpful for actors.
 
Sharon Cinnamon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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