1993

Re: "Shakespeare in the Bush"

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 869.  Tuesday, 30 November 1993.
 
From:           K. Y. Chin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 23:38:30 -0600 (UTC -06:00)
Subject: 4.0851  Re: "Shakespeare in the Bush"
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0851  Re: "Shakespeare in the Bush"
 
You can easily find this article in _Anthropology: Contemporary Perspectives_,
4th ed. (Little, Brown & Company, 1985) or _Applying Anthropology: An Intro-
ductory Reader_ (Mayfield, 1989) or you can go directly to the _Natural
History_Magazine, Aug.-Sep., 1966.
 
K.Y.Chin/Kansas

Re: Moons of Uranus

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 868.  Tuesday, 30 November 1993.
 
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 16:18:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Moons of Uranus
 
A recent question about the moons of Uranus turned into a question about how to
access the GOPHER system at University of Pennsylvania.  I'm not sure how
accessing GOPHER for characters in Shakespeare tells one the names of the moons
of Uranus (even if they are named for characters from Shakespeare's plays), but
I asked a colleague in physics about the moons, and he obligingly sent me an
informative photocopy through campus mail.
 
The photocopy certainly contains all the information that the inquirer wanted,
but I'm not sure that my forwarding the information to the network is
appropriate.  After all, the original question was asked as a means of gaining
"extra credit." Presumably the professor who offered the credit wanted her
students to discover the research tools for physics--something like the book my
colleague turned to in supplying me with the information.  Does SHAKSPER count
as a research tool for physics, if in fact an English professor got the
information from another physicist who did the actual research?

Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 866.  Tuesday, 30 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Katherine West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:00:49 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 11:24:01 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0863  Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
(3)     From:   Christine Stoddard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 12:35:37 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
(4)     From:   Jack Lynch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 15:56:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
(5)     From:   Sharon Cinnamon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 16:34:02 -0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Katherine West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:00:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
You might also look at Edward Bond's _Lear_, and I think the _Othello_
you're referring to must by _Goodnight Desdemona (Goodmorning Juliet)_
by Ann Marie MacDonald.
 
Katherine West
University of Toronto
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 11:24:01 -0400
Subject: 4.0863  Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0863  Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
What about *Goodnight Desdemona, Good Morning Juliet."  It's an interesting
sort of Jungian tale, in which an aging teaching assistant is sucked into a
vortex of Shakespeare plays.  A few of the jokes are only funny if you're
Canadian, but on the whole it's pretty good. The Neptune theatre, here in
Halifax, played it last season and the season before, but not this year.  I
have a copy if you need biblio information.
 
Sincerely,
        Sean Lawrence
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Stoddard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 12:35:37 -0400
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
Laurie White,  _Goodnight Desdemona, Goodmorning Juliet_ is a possibility.
I don't have publishing info but you may want to contact Neptune Theatre
(Halifax, NS CAN).  _Shakespeare's Women_ was performed at Dalhousie U
a few years ago, as well.
 
Christine Stoddard
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Lynch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 15:56:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
> I am planning an undergrad. Honors seminar in Shakespeare spinoffs.  So
> far I've collected the following ideas: Hamlet: Love Song of J.A. Pruf.;
> Rosencr. and Guildenstern Are Dead; Fortinbras Get Drunk.  King Lear: A
> Thousand Acres. Othello: Desdemona (title?  it's a new play on broadway.)
> I know there are many such borrowings (including West Side Story and Kiss
> Me Kate, which I don't want to do), but i'd appreciate any suggestions.
 
If you're interested in film, don't miss Kurosawa's _Throne of Blood_ and
_Ran_.  Two of the best Shakespeare movies ever made, even if they're not
Shakespeare.
 
  -- Jack Lynch; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sharon Cinnamon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 16:34:02 -0100
Subject: 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0853  Q: Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
A new play touring by the National Theatre was recently in Boston called
"The Madness of George III."  A lot of Lear and Cymbeline can be seen in
it.  Also, what about Stoppard's "A Dogg's Hamlet" and "Cahoot's Macbeth."
 
Sharon Cinnamon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Literary Device

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 867.  Tuesday, 30 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Ed Pechter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:12:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0859  Re: Literary Device
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 22:12:25 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0852  Q: Literary Device
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pechter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:12:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0859  Re: Literary Device
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0859  Re: Literary Device
 
Maybe Ann Barton in *The Names of Comedy* provides rhetorical names for
appropriate character names.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 22:12:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0852  Q: Literary Device
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0852  Q: Literary Device
 
Michael,
 
George Lakey (of Philadelphia fame) told me years ago that the term was
charactonym. He said that he got the word from a professor at West Chester
College (PA).
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Electronic Scholarship and Texts

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 865.  Tuesday, 30 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 93 06:38:02 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(2)     From:   Michael S. Hart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 93 09:28:42 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(3)     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 93 11:36:35 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0848  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(4)     From:   Kevin Berland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 93 13:01 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(5)     From:   James Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:59:10 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
(6)     From:   James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1993 22:47:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   electrotexts
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 93 06:38:02 PST
Subject: 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
It might be at some point emphasized how, if Original Intent were
regarded as standard in place of this renegade postmodern resource
ramble we are embarked upon whereupon symbols accrete on page or screen
as so much snow beheld by infidels, then the author(s)
him(er)sel(f)(ves) might well sneer at how we have denoted and deified a
spattering of cribbed and crabbed actors' notes as holy scripture when
the medium intended was to broadcast freely about on the very air from
the breaths of actors, but I won't...
 
I will own, however, that suspenders are superior in both senses to the
belt, that I myself might often be found in the dusty bins of used
bookstalls, and you can find a meg of 70ns Mac (of course, the superior
platform) SIMM at the local outlet for $38.88 American...
 
Timothy Bowden
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael S. Hart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 93 09:28:42 CST
Subject: 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0855  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
This is a reply to the note
 
From:           James McKenna <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 27 Nov 1993 18:33:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0848  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0848  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
Reply to Timothy Bowden:
 
***
 
Aside from the obvious linguistic comments I shall not make, I would like to
point out that not only are the same kind of notebook in use by myself and
millions of others, as are the kind of books we use at our desks and elsewhere,
but that an error made in paper research is just as likely to be made in
electronic research. . .i.e. "validity verus reliability."
 
A researcher presuming that a search result is both reliable and valid because
it came from a computer, is no different a commodity than one who presumes such
because those reference librarians who are so helpful, have placed the same
data for consideration.
 
Of course, the first thing taught a reference librarian is a "reference
interview" which is also the first thing that the researcher should be taught
in bibliographic instruction.  A few laps around the course of bibliographic
instruction will yield improved results in both the paper AND Etext library.
 
Meanwhile, will someone please tell me how to download Etext files, in their
entirety, of the Complete Shakespeare Etext, which has been discussed for years
on this listserver.
 
Thanks,
 
Best Wishes For The Holiday Season!
 
Michael S. Hart, Professor of Electronic Text
Executive Director of Project Gutenberg Etext
Illinois Benedictine College, Lisle, IL 60532
No official connection to U of Illinois--UIUC
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 93 11:36:35 EST
Subject: 4.0848  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0848  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
A passage from Joseph Wood Krutch seems possibly relevant:
 
   Just suppose that the radio, the phonograph, the film strip, and all the
rest of it had been in existence since the Fifteenth Century but that books had
just been invented.  What a marvelous advance in communication that would be!
And how many advantages it would seem to have over any previously known means,
including ready availability and the possibility of wide choice.  What comes
over the air is chosen for you by someone else and you must receive the
communication at a particular moment, or not at all.  A book, on the other
hand, you can choose for yourself and you can read it at your own convenience.
It is always available while a broadcast is gone forever.  And how much more
economical in time a book is!  Deduct from a half-hour broadcast the musical
fanfare, the station announcement, the sponsor's commercial, etc., etc., and
you can learn by five minutes with a book more than you can get in a half-hour
broadcast.  "Why," we would say, "this marvelous new invention, the book, just
about makes radio obsolete."   (From JWK's _More Lives Than One_)
 
While the relative merits of radio and books are no longer in question, the
general line of argument when one compares electronic and printed texts has a
certain familiarity.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin Berland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 93 13:01 EST
Subject: 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
This argument, it seems to me, introduces some classic examples of logical
fallacies -- such as the False Dilemma: we must choose *either* books or
e-texts.  Pshaw!  I want both.  More choices,
 
And, while still in the curmudgeon-mode, I must take issue with I don't
remember now who -- my colleague in this branch of the New Invisible
University who alluded to the recycling of Paperbacks Will Destroy
the World As We Know It rhetoric.  I agree that alarmist rhetoric is
often deceptive, wrong-headed, and even dangerous -- but it's also
sometimes true.  The technological innovations of paperback & mass
market book-making *have* created problems: planned obsolescence,
dissolving glue, yellow snow, &c. &c.  My valuable teaching editions
of paperback Ardens, heavily annotated, fall all over the floor and
cause confusion and embarassment... One more little point: were those
who cried that the sky was falling when television started growing
and threatening literacy.... were they wrong?
 
Grumpily yours & off to class,
Kevin Berland
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 10:59:10 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0857  Re: Electronic Scholarship
 
Like Bill Godshalk, I love my books--but I could never function without
my computers. I don't, at this point, want to enter the books/electronic
text debate, but I do want to ask fellow SHAKSPERians for some help
and advice. The +MLA Hand Book= is now undergoing revision--especially
in light of the proliferation of electronic texts, electronic
discussion groups, and GOPHERS. Part of this revision involves the
creation (or reinement) of a form for citing electronic materials.
As a member of the advisory committee for the revision, I would very
much like to see examples of any citations to electronic materials
that you may have used in your own work or received in paper from
students. And, I would welcome any suggestions that you might have
regarding citation style for electronic materials.
 
                Jim Harner (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1993 22:47:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        electrotexts
 
My last try...really!
 
I'm not writing jeremiads.  Were I, I doubt I'd write them here.  Mr. Lavignino
suggests looking into electronic texts themselves, rather than just resisting
them.  I've maintained from the beginning that I do just that--and
successfully.  I recommend to all around me to use as much electronic help as
they can get their hands on.  That's the way the game is played these days; you
cut your nose off to spite your face to do otherwise.  Still...still, still,
still, thank God for the Amish, for the Hassidim, for The Farm in Tennessee (if
it's still going), for cloisters everywhere, that remind us that blinding speed
is a means that can drive us to its own brainless and mechanical ends.  Why
must one be accused of imbecile romanticism for pointing out that gains must be
paid for with losses, and that we ought to choose rather than just accept?  I
maintain only that much change occurs very fast with little or no thought given
to long-term consequences.  Remember, "change" and "improvement" are _not_
synonyms.
 
Cordially, respectfully, and with a touch of disappointment,
 
James McKenna
U of Cincinnati
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.