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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: November ::
Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 698.  Monday, 1 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Sunday, 31 Oct 1993 16:20:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0691  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
(2)     From:   James Schaefer <
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        Date:   Sunday, 31 Oct 1993 21:38:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0696  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
(3)     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Nov 93 10:46:16 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishmen
 
(4)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Monday, 1 Nov 93  14:43 GMT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Sunday, 31 Oct 1993 16:20:26 -0400
Subject: 4.0691  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0691  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
About Shakespeare and education in Anglophone countries: When I told the
supervisor of my honours seminar in African history that I'd rather do a
master's in Shakespeare, he told me about a travelling group of Shakespearean
actors he knew while at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria.  They carried
their equipment on a flatbed truck which also served as stage.
 
In fact, they managed to fill the soccer stadium in Onitsha for *Macbeth*.  So
he comforted me with the thought that I wasn't really divorcing myself from my
earlier work altogether.
 
Just an anecdote,
        Sean Lawrence
        
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <
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Date:           Sunday, 31 Oct 1993 21:38:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0696  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0696  Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
At some point in grad school I read that Shakespeare was the most frequently
performed playwright in Eastern Europe; Oscar Wilde was the second
most popular.  This was compatible with comments some years before by a
friend and former undergrad prof of mine who grew up in Hungary:  he
reported that he had read Shakespeare as a student, and learned English
by reading the plays of Oscar Wilde.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Nov 93 10:46:16 SAST-2
Subject: 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishmen
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishmen
 
Shakespeare has certainly played a central role in the educational
establishments of South Africa, and he is used in similar ways as a mark of
"culture" and "civilization".  One of the earliest members of the ANC, Sol
Plaatje, shows the marked influence of his Shakespearean missionary education
in his own work, and it would be a fascinating research topic to trace the ways
in which Shakespeare has both been appropriated and used in the process of
appropriation in South Africa.
 
Readings of Caliban vary, for instance, from fairly standard "postcolonial
views" of Caliban as the oppressed (black) native, to English-speakers'
jingoist readings of him as the incorrigably backward and savage "Boer" or
Afrikaner.  The latter readings show no sympathy for Caliban, of course, and
side with Prosporo's civilizing magic.
 
This is not really my area of expertise, although I'd like to take it up when I
have some time.  Martin Orkin (_Shakespeare Against Apartheid_) has done quite
a bit of work in this area.  He's in the English Department, University of the
Witwatersrand, Wits 2050.  An ex-student of mine, David Johnson, has just
finished a PhD on the issue at the University of Sussex, England, and can be
contacted via the English Department there.
 
David Schalkwyk
English Department
University of Cape Town
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Monday, 1 Nov 93  14:43 GMT
Subject: 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
Dear Al Cacicedo: On Shakespeare in India, there's a lot of fascinating
material in Gauri Viswanathan's *Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and
British Rule in India* (New York, Columbia, 1989)
 
Terry Hawkes
 

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