Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: November ::
Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 836. Thursday, 24 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Tad Davis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 09:49:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
(2)     From:   James Schaefer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 09:45:29 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
(3)     From:   Joseph Lawrence Lyle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 13:41:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
(4)     From:   William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 22:16:54 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 09:49:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
Anthony Burgess has a story in his collection, "The Devil's Mode," that
touches briefly and with the typical Burgess humor, on the idea of Hamlet
and Faustus being at Wittenberg at the same time. There is another story
in the same collection that deals with an encounter between Shakespeare
and Cervantes, the King's Men being for some reason in Spain.
 
     Tad Davis
     
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 09:45:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
I like David Richman's idea about doing *Hamlet* and *Faustus*
in repertory!  I've been working for some years with Gertrude Stein's
version of the Faust legend (*Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights*), which
is more akin to Goethe's version than Marlowe's, and much more aware of
the ambiguity (as opposed to mere greedy guilt) of scholarship, more
aware of the tension between grabbing the main chance and "by
indirections, find[ing] direction out."  The two would work very well
together.
 
Jim Schaefer
Graduate School
Georgetown University

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
(202) 687-4478
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Lawrence Lyle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 13:41:47 -0500
Subject: 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
Horatio *does* go to Wittenberg--in order to ask Faust what
Hamlet was like in his college days.  According to a recent play?
Novel?  Sound familiar?
Jay Lyle
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1993 22:16:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0838  Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
To David Richman:
 
What a wonderful fantasy! Let's think about this. Shakespeare surely remembered
DR. FAUSTUS, and so when he makes Hamlet a student in Germany and at Wittenberg
at that, why can't we make the connection? Where does it lead? And what about
Martin Luther? Was Hamlet a proto-Lutheran? Was Hamlet Senior a Catholic?
 
I think I'm having my pre-Thanksgiving fantasy.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.