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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: November ::
Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 844. Friday, 25 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Robert O'Connor <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Nov 1993 09:28:54 +0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
(2)     From:   Robert O'Connor <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Nov 1993 09:38:02 +0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert O'Connor <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Nov 1993 09:28:54 +0700
Subject: 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
A Polish lecturer I had as an undergrad once told a tutorial group about I
play he had seen produced just after the war, in which it was asserted that
Faust was Hamlet's tutor at Wittenberg!
 
As a friend of mine observed at the time, it provides a novel excuse:
"Sorry my essay is late, my tutor got dragged off to Hell . . . "
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert O'Connor <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Nov 1993 09:38:02 +0700
Subject: 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0835  Re: Hamlet at Wittenberg
 
Yesterday, Bill Godshalk asked:
 
>And what about Martin Luther? Was Hamlet a
>proto-Lutheran? Was Hamlet Senior a Catholic?
 
I seem to recall these questions being addressed in a book by Robert
Rentoul Reed, *Crime and God's Judgement in Shakespeare* - I have found it
both interesting and useful.
 
Robert F. O'Connor
 

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