1993

Re: Literacy

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 772.  Friday, 12 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 16:47:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: 4.SHK 0762  Q: Literacy
 
(2)     From:   Paul Budra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 93 20:19:30 PST
        Subj:   Re: 4.SHK 0762  Q: Literacy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 16:47:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 0762  Q: Literacy
Comment:        Re: 4.SHK 0762  Q: Literacy
 
William Manchester, A WORLD LIT ONLY BY FIRE, gives a series of literacy rates
by profession - as I recall. Of course, this is not a work presenting primary
research, and I can't remember when he got those rates!
 
Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Budra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 93 20:19:30 PST
Subject: 0762  Q: Literacy
Comment:        Re: 4.SHK 0762  Q: Literacy
 
RE. K. Nolan's question on literacy rates.  See the work of both
Daniel Woolf, who is interested in the transmission of historical
information among the illiterate in the early modern period, and
Margaret Spufford, who takes Cressy to task for some oversight in
enumeration.  Be sure to check out the bibliographies in both authors'
works.
 
That should get you started.
 
Paul Budra
SFU

Re: Shakespeare, Ontology, and History

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 771.  Friday, 12 November 1993.
 
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 17:02:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0761  Re: Ontology, Shakespeare, and History
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0761  Re: Ontology, Shakespeare, and History
 
Nancy,
 
Thanks for your reply. Now I understand. Recently in a review, Frank Kermode
argued, pursuasively, I think, that we should distinguish among documents. He
suggested, as I recall, that we should consider the intention. As I recall, he
uses the illustration of a subway schedule and a play. I could be wrong, but
aren't these two different kinds of historical document? Their functions as
well as the intentions of their authors are quite different.
 
Yours, Bill

Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 769.  Friday, 12 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas Blackburn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursay, 11 Nov 1993 14:31:52 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
 
(2)     From:   Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 16:53:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Blackburn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 14:31:52 +0000
Subject: 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
 
Michael,
 
I don't know if I can by the have a transportable version of my
hypercard/quicktime stack of soliloquies from Hamlet and Macbeth, but put me
down as interested in the meeting. Cheers, Tom Blackburn
 
Thomas H. Blackburn
Centennial Professor of English
Swarthmore College
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1397
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 16:53:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0760  Re: Hypermedia Meeting at SAA
 
Michael,
 
I too would like to learn more about hypermedia.  If you're thinking of
doing something at the SAA, please let me know.
 
Thanks,
Al Cacicedo
Dept. of English
Albright College
P. O. Box 15234
Reading, PA 19612-5234
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Re: Gertrude, Incest, and Adultery

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 770.  Friday, 12 November 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Karin Youngberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 15:33:30 GMT-500
        Subj:   Re: Gertrude
 
(2)     From:   Kimberly Nolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 15:38:41 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0737  Re: Incest
 
(3)     From:   A.G. Bennett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 17:14 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0759  Re: Gertrude
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karin Youngberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 15:33:30 GMT-500
Subject:        Re: Gertrude
 
>Let me try again to pose my question: when the Ghost says, "Ay, that
>incestuous, that adulterate beast," he makes two charges against Claudius (and
>I assume Gertrude). The charge of incest would apply whether Claudius is alive
>or dead (thus, he says later in the speech, "Let not the royal bed of Denmark
>be/A couch for luxury and damned incest").  But could Claudius and Gertrude be
>regarded as adulterous if their relationship began after King Hamlet had died?
>I don't think so.  Two possibilities exist here: 1) Gertrude was unfaithful
>while her first husband was alive (how does the Ghost know this?  That's not
>clear,but neither is it clear how he learns that Claudius poured hebona in his
>ear); 2) Gertrude was not adulterous, but the Ghost thinks of himself as still
>alive & therefore makes his accusation.
 
Perhaps we might add a third possibility here.  The word "adulterous" is
glossed in the OED as meaning in the sixteenth century "pertaining to or
characterized by adulteration," i.e  counterfeit or spurious. Although
admittedly the proximity of the word "incest" and the bedroom setting would
focus attention on sexual activity, the sense of counterfeit, or not being what
one appears to be, is certainly in keeping with sentiments Hamlet expresses in
his first soliloquy and elsewhere.
 
Karin Youngberg
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kimberly Nolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 15:38:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0737  Re: Incest
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0737  Re: Incest
 
I think we need to be carefule about reading the incest issue in _Hamlet_
too literally.  I found Bruce Boehrer's book _Monarchy and Incest in Ren-
aissance England_ to be very useful.  I haven't looked at it in a year so
I hesitate to try to articulate his thesis, but I believe he argues that
the theme of incest was firmly imbedded in the Elizabethan and Jacobean
consciousness as a symbol for variuos shifts in kinship, family structure,
and issues of inheritance.  I feel that I've made a mess of his fine work,
the citation I am thinking of is on pages 11-13 of the book mentioned above.
I hope someone with a better background in this area can add to our discussion.
 
Speaking of inheritance--has anyone thought of Claudius as a second son fraught
with all the baggage that role carries?
 
K. Nolan
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           A.G. Bennett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 1993 17:14 EDT
Subject: 4.0759  Re: Gertrude
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0759  Re: Gertrude
 
James Schiffer asked, "Could Claudius and Gertrude be regarded as adulterous if
their relationship began after King Hamlet had died?" I think the answer could
very well be yes, if we consider the degrees of consanguinity which  forbade
marriage among close relations-- as far as I know, Leviticus 18.16 ("Thou
shalt not uncover the nakedness of thy brother's wife: it is thy brother's
nakedness") is probably still a guideline for the canon laws against incest in
Shakespeare's time-- Leviticus 18 as a whole is the basis on which those laws
were built, I think. Intriguingly enough, Leviticus 18.16 was also the verse
on which Henry VIII based his case for divorcing Katherine of Aragon, which
raises the question of whether the memory of that uproar might have provided
an added dimension to contemporary audiences....
 
Just my hap'orth....
 
Alex Bennett
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The Power of Electronic Tools

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 767.  Friday, 12 November 1993.
 
From:           Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Nov 93 10:11:30 PST
Subject:        [Power of Electronic Tools]
 
Some years ago, there drifted out of the literary movement which was forming as
I was a testament by Allen Ginsberg consisting of a quote attributed through
William Burroughs to Shakespeare.  The immediate reference was to the literate
and learned style of Mr Burroughs in those early Columbia days, the subtext was
the rising above petty contention, and the lines ran something like: `It's an
argument too starved for my sword.'
 
Now, I've used that line (and the incomplete source) for years myself, yet
being neither a Bard scholar nor having easy access to one before now, I never
sought out just precisely where or even if the phrase occurred in the works.
The burden, physical, and mental, of research just became easier.
 
In place of my ten pound volume of Complete Works, I now have a shiny wafer
just over four inches in diameter.  I slip it into my Mac and I query it about
the line I've been carrying in my head so long.
 
The screen shows me in nanoseconds Act I Scene I of _Troilus and Cressida_:
 
  TROILUS:  Peace, you ungracious clamours!  peace, rude sounds!
                      Fools on both sides!  Helen must needs be fair,
                      When with your blood you daily paint her thus.
                      I cannot fight upon this argument;
                      It is too starved a subject for my sword.
 
There is more to scholarship than the indexing of quotes, but I wonder if there
is not back in the musty shelves behind the research desks of many libraries
the lurking literary luddities who resent how the modern age places such
powerful tools into the hands of mere neophytes - why, there is available the
technology to move a mouse to the textual presence of Gertrude and with a click
cause to appear all the world's wisdom on this much-maligned lady...
 
=========================================================
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Timothy Bowden)
uunet!scruz.ucsc.edu!clovis.felton.ca.us!tcbowden
Clovis in Felton, CA
=========================================================

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