1993

*Three-Text Hamlet*; Riverside Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 813.  Wednesday, 17 Nov. 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Bernice Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 1993 21:41 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0800  Q1, Q2, and F1 Closet Scenes
 
(2)     From:   Charles Edelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 93 12:02
        Subj:   Riverside Shakespeare
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1993 21:41 EDT
Subject: 4.0800  Q1, Q2, and F1 Closet Scenes
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0800  Q1, Q2, and F1 Closet Scenes
 
Have SHAKSPERians heard of the *Three-Text Hamlet* published by AMS Press?
Coedited by Paul Bertram and Me? It's possible your library has it.
 
Bernice
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Edelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 93 12:02
Subject:        Riverside Shakespeare
 
Dear Hardy
 
Thanks to everyone (including yourself) for the very helpful information
on the electronic edition of the Riverside Shakespeare.  Very much
appreciated.
 
Getting cold in N.America / Europe?  Think about the Perth Australia
conference in February.  Beautiful beaches nearby.

Re: Iago's Age

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 812.  Wednesday, 17 Nov. 1993.
 
From:           Herbert Donow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 93 17:58:24 CST
Subject:        Iago's Age
 
Gareth Euridge finds it difficult to visualize Iago as a mere lad of
twenty-eight.  Shakespeare probably didn't. After all Richard III was only
thirty-one when he became king.  And how old was Michael Milken when he made
his first billion.
 
Herb Donow
Southern Illinois University@Carbondale

Re: The Ghost in *Hamlet*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 810.  Wednesday, 17 Nov. 1993.
 
From:           Robert O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1993 12:04:40 +0700
Subject: 4.0803  Re: The Ghost in *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0803  Re: The Ghost in *Hamlet*
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans,
 
It is good to see that any question about *Hamlet* will set off a volley
of questions.  When I was working on the play for my Honours dissertation a
few years ago, the Mel Gibson movie came out and I soon found that EVERYONE
had a theory!
 
The Ghost fascinates me as much as it does many others; one thing I came
across when researching my dissertaion was a remark of Harold Jenkins' in
the Arden edition of the play.  In the notes to I.ii.255 (p.197), he reports
the recieved view from classical times that "ghosts were the spirits of the
departed", and that this was disputed by the Protestants - as Nick Clary
pointed out.  Jenkins, however, claims that this dispute "is not
dramatically relevant" on the grounds that "Shakespeare is aware of various
beliefs and allows Hamlet to be the same."
 
Is the dispute "dramatically relevant"?  The sources cited by Nick Clary -
and the one by Jenkins (Burton) - surely inform the play-in-performance,
now and then, as much as the text.  On the other hand, to introduce too
many views to this question (and to others) may be to 'smear' the issue
across so many possibilities as to make it meaningless.
 
Most of the productions I have seen have NOT doubled the parts - the Ghost
is often played by one of the seniors of the troupe, though I have seen one
version where it was never seen on stage by anyone - a consensual
hallucination, perhaps.  About ten years ago a local company managed to
have the same actor play Hamlet and the Ghost, by virtue of a technical
trick, I confess: the Ghost was filmed intoning his lines and then
projected onto a gauze screen which was lowered over the front of the stage
in the appropriate screen.  This presentation, I felt, inclined the
spectator toward the "spirit of health" view, that the Ghost was in fact
the shade of Hamlet's father.  I lean toward the "goblin damned" view of
the Ghost myself.  If it is not a prejudgement of Claudius, I suggest that
to double the parts of Claudius and the Ghost is to reinforce this view.
The point I am trying to make, I suppose, is that how the Ghost is 'seen'
or 'read' depends very much on the performance.  Those productions that do
not physically present the Ghost on stage - suggestive as this may be -
are, I think, taking an easy way out.
 
Robert O'Connor

Hilary Putnam

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 811.  Wednesday, 17 Nov. 1993.
 
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1993 20:52:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Hilary Putnam
 
Actually Hilary Putnam wrote in a very rich context, and he wrote the
following: "Contrary to a doctrine that has been with us since the seventeenth
century, meanings just aren't in the head" (REASON, TRUTH AND HISTORY,
Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981: 19). Putnam italicizes the last six words. He
also rejects 'intentionality' "as no solution" in the reference game. But I for
one find that sentence, "meanings just aren't in the head," puzzling. If he
means that the brain does not construct meaning, I find that counter-intuitive.
If he means that the brain in isolation from an invironment cannot construct
meaning, I agree. Actually Putnam says, "the determination of reference is
social and not individual" (18).
 
But Putnam seems to be an ambivalent ally in the Culture Wars. In his essay
"Literature, Science, and Religion," He writes that MEDEA and THE BROTHERS
KARAMAZOV "are great and moving works of art. We are above all human beings,
and these works do move us as human being" (MEANING AND THE MORAL SCIENCES,
London: Routledge, 1978: 89). There's no mention of Cultural Determinism here.
 
But more important, in contrast to Kristeva and Derrida, Putnam writes with
simplicity and clarity. Even his puzzling passages can be explained with some
ease. I find simplicity and clarity a virtue.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
P.S. Al, did you really believe that Hilary Putnam wrote "ain't"? WLG

Call for Contributions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 809.  Wednesday, 17 Nov. 1993.
 
From:           John Gouws <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1993 22:21:42 +0200 (EET)
Subject:        Call for Contributions
 
CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
 
*SHAKESPEARE IN SOUTHERN AFRICA: JOURNAL OF THE SHAKESPEARE SOCIETY OF
SOUTHERN AFRICA*
 
Subject to satisfactory referees' reports, space is available for two
articles of usual length in volume 6, 1993.
 
The journal sets out to publish articles, commentary and reviews on all
aspects of Shakepsearean studies and performance, with particular
emphasis on the response to Shakespeare in southern Africa.
 
Submissions are reviewed by at least two referees, who may be either
editorial consultants or members of the Advisory Board.
 
Manuscripts should be double-spaced.  Full publication details must be
provided for all sources cited.
 
Manuscripts should be sent to:
 
The Editor,
*Shakespeare in Southern Africa*,
Institute for the Study of English in Africa,
Rhodes University,
Grahamstown 6140,
South Africa.
 
FAX: + 27 + 461 + 25642
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
--
     John Gouws - Department of English - Rhodes University
     P.O. Box 94 - Grahamstown 6140 - South Africa
   Internet: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Telephone: (0461) 318402 or 318400

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