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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: October ::
Landmark for SHAKSPER; New on the SHAKSPER FileServer
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 624.  Sunday, 3 October 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, October 3, 1993
Subject:        Landmark for SHAKSPER; New on the SHAKSPER FileServer
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans,
 
I am pleased to announce that, as of Sunday, October 3, 1993, SHAKSPER
has 403 active members.  When I became SHAKSPER's editor in May of 1992,
the membership was in the lows 230s.  Since then, I have been delighted by
our conference's continued growth and vitality.
 
SHAKSPEReans may wish to order any or all of the files in the New Member
Package to get a clearer idea of who we are.  This Package contains the
following:
 
 Filename Filetype Filelist  Description
 -------- -------- --------  -----------------------------------
  NEWMEMBR PACKAGE  SHAKSPER   (The complete New Member Package)
  DISCUSS  INDEX_1  SHAKSPER   (An index to SHAKSPER's first-year discussions)
  DISCUSS  INDEX_2  SHAKSPER   (An index to SHAKSPER's second-year discussions)
  DISCUSS  INDEX_3  SHAKSPER   (An index to SHAKSPER's third-year discussions)
  DISCUSS  INDEX_4  SHAKSPER   (An index to SHAKSPER's fourth-year discussions)
  SHAKSPER ANNOUNCE SHAKSPER   (Announcement of SHAKSPER Conference)
  SHAKSPER LOG9308  SHAKSPER   (The August 1993 Log)
  SHAKSPER LOG9309  SHAKSPER   (The September 1993 Log)
  SHAKSPER LOG9310  SHAKSPER   (The October 1993 Log -- in progress)
  SHAKSPER GUIDE    SHAKSPER   (The Member's Guide to SHAKSPER)
  SHAKSPER FILES    SHAKSPER   (SHAKSPER Fileserver File Listing)
  SHAKSPER MEMBERS  SHAKSPER   (SHAKSPER Membership List)
  SHAKS-12 BIOGRAFY SHAKSPER   (The Fourteenth File of Member Biographies)
  SHAKS-13 BIOGRAFY SHAKSPER   (The Fifteenth File in progress)
 
If you would like to get copies of all of the SHAKSPER Member Biographies,
you can retrieve them by issuing the interactive command, "TELL LISTSERV AT
UTORONTO GET BIOGRAFY PACKAGE SHAKSPER."  If your network link does not
support the interactive "TELL" command (i.e. if you are not directly on
Bitnet), or if LISTSERV rejects your request, then send a one-line mail
message (without a subject line) to LISTSERV@utoronto, reading "GET BIOGRAFY
PACKAGE SHAKSPER."  For further information, consult the appropriate section
of your SHAKSPER GUIDE.
 
As of today, SHAKSPEReans may also retrieve two papers of new SHAKSPER members
from the SHAKSPER Fileserver -- Douglas Green's "New-Minted Shakespeare:
Old Currency in a New Classroom Economy" (CLASSRM ECONOMY) and Marta
Oliveira's "Shakespeare's Sonnet LXXIII and Love" (SONNET73 AND_LOVE).
 
SHAKSPEReans can retrieve CLASSRM ECONOMY by issuing the interactive
command, "TELL LISTSERV AT UTORONTO GET CLASSRM EONOMY SHAKSPER."  If your
network link does not support the interactive "TELL" command (i.e. if you
are not directly on Bitnet), or if LISTSERV rejects your request, then
send a one-line mail message (without a subject line) to LISTSERV@utoronto,
reading "GET CLASSRM ECONOMY SHAKSPER."
 
SHAKSPEReans can retrieve SONNET73 AND_LOVE by issuing the interactive
command, "TELL LISTSERV AT UTORONTO GET SONNET73 AND_LOVE SHAKSPER."  If your
network link does not support the interactive "TELL" command (i.e. if you
are not directly on Bitnet), or if LISTSERV rejects your request, then
send a one-line mail message (without a subject line) to LISTSERV@utoronto,
reading "GET SONNET73 AND_LOVE SHAKSPER."
 
Should you have difficulty receiving any of these files, please contact the
editor, <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 > or <SHAKSPER@utoronto.bitnet>.
 
*******************************************************************************
New-Minting Shakespeare: Old Currency in a New Classroom Economy
(1993 SAA Research Seminar Paper:  Postmodern Pedagogies/Early Modern
Classrooms)
 
What is much less clear is how we can get beyond this particular ideology.
For Shakespeare as fetish has, in this time of perceived crisis in the
humanities, become the ideology of our age.
(Garber 250)
What all this activity means for Shakespeareans mainly concerned with
teaching the works of the playwright to the relatively uninitiated is not
immediately clear.                      (Willson  207)
 
Given developments in contemporary literary theory, especially as they
address our own personal, pedagogical, and political concerns, given the
changing function of the teacher in the classroom, and given the changing
constituents of the undergraduate classroom, teaching Shakespeare today can
be rather confusing, an endless succession of compromises that compromise.
 
On the one hand, our institutions, students' parents and families, and even
students themselves often expect (and sometimes demand) courses in "greats"
like Shakespeare.  The motivation may be unabashedly materialistic:
potential employers might be impressed by students' liberal education, so
some students want names that they can trade on.   Or it may be a subtler
but equally troubling matter of self-worth, one that our very means of
making a living--teaching Shakespeare--validates:  familiarity with
Shakespeare signifies being educated, intelligent, etc.   On the other
hand, many of us who teach Shakespeare want to disrupt both universalist
views of the Bard as a reservoir of abiding truths and the often
unconscious connections between the study of Shakespeare and the worth of
one's education.  At the very least we want students to recognize and
question the 'value' of Shakespeare in several senses.
 
*******************************************************************************
              SHAKESPEARE'S SONNET LXXIII AND LOVE
 
I will try to examine here some aspects of  Shakespeare's  Sonnet
LXXIII (see Appendix) which I hope will try to shed some light on
Shakespeare's  concept  of love and its relation to time.  It has
been argued by Jan  Kott  *(Shakespeare  our  contemporary)  that
Shakespeare's  sonnets may be read as drama.  Indeed,  in them we
find three characters,  a man,  a youth  and  a  woman,  and  the
various   stages   of   their  relation,   which  passes  through
friendship, love, jealousy, etc,  are there explored as they will
also be in a variety of moods throughout the plays.
 

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