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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: October ::
Re: Il Moro; *Coriolanus* Ban
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 629.  Wednesday, 6 October 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Al Cacicedo <
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        Date:   Monday, 4 Oct 1993 23:01:55 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: "Il Moro" and "Moor"
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Oct 1993 23:14:28 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: *Coriolanus* Ban; *R&G Are Dead* and *Hamlet*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <
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Date:           Monday, 4 Oct 1993 23:01:55 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: "Il Moro" and "Moor"
 
In reply to Sean Lawrence's question about whether being called "Il Moro"
means that one is a "Moor," I can only report the common usage in Cuban
Spanish, which applies the term "moro" to anyone of "European" descent
with particularly dark skin.  I can only conjecture that the same is
true in Italian.
 
Good luck trying to figure it out!
Al Cacicedo (alc @joe.alb.edu)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Oct 1993 23:14:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: *Coriolanus* Ban; *R&G Are Dead* and *Hamlet*
 
I understand Cary Mazer's point, but I like to say that every production is an
"interpretation" of one of Shakespeare's script. What Philip Brockbank was
writing about in 1976 was scripts and subsequently performances. I think that
there is a difference between "interpreting" Shakespeare's script and
performing an adapted script or a freely translated script. Compare MACBETH
and, say, MCBIRD. (I hope that's the right spelling.)
 
Sincerely, Bill Godshalk
 

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