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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: October ::
Re: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 691.  Saturday, 30 October 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Mullin <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Oct 1993 09:19:50 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
(2)     From:   Lars Engle <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Oct 1993 10:49:32 GMT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
(3)     From:   Jim Forse <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Oct 1993 12:11 EST
        Subj:   Re Shakespeare and Anglophone countries
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Mullin <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Oct 1993 09:19:50 -0600
Subject: 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
Dear Al Cacicedo,
 
        The short answer is yes.  In Anglophone countries certainly, for
many many reasons, not the least the Cambridge University Entrance
Examination--something like the ACT-SAT--used to determine university
qualifications in the British Commonwealth and elsewhere.  I don't know
about Belize, though its British connection would incline me to guess that
Shakespeare's on the curriculum, but I do know that in Brazil there's a
center for Shakespeare studies and that Shakespeare's been used as a
protest dramatist in Argentina.  And it goes without saying that
Shakespeare is part of the educational and theatrical cultures of Europe,
East and West.
 
        I'd be interested to learn more on this subject too, as I'm doing
research for a book, CD-ROM, and national exhibition entitled "Our
Shakespeares:" Shakespeare Across Cultures.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lars Engle <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Oct 1993 10:49:32 GMT
Subject: 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0680  Q: Shakespeare and Educational Establishments
 
In reply to Al Cacicedo's query: Ania Loomba's *Gender, race, Renaissance drama
* discusses the centrality of Shakespeare and Renaissance drama generally in
Indian educational institutions, and does so very persuasively.
 
Lars Engle,
University of Tulsa
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Forse <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Oct 1993 12:11 EST
Subject:        Re Shakespeare and Anglophone countries
 
I have a piece of indirect evidence to suggest that Shakespeare may well be a
central part of education--at least in Nigeria.  Following is a note I made at
a conference.  Unfortunately, I cannot identify the speaker's academic
affiliation--did not record that. Professor W. T. Brown, "Shakespeare on
Wheels," paper presented before the Shakespeare and Renaissance Association of
West Virginia (23 April 1988), described that when presenting a travelling
troupe to Nigerian audiences, often the audiences would echo aloud the most
famous soliloquies when an actor began to deliver them.
 
I also think A. L. Rowse's quirky "modern" translation of Shakespeare's works
was in part designed for the non-British, non-American market.
 
Jim Forse: History, Bowling Green State Univ.
 
[Shakespeare on Wheels is a project of the University of Maryland at Baltimore
County; Professor Brown, I am reasonably sure, is one of its founders and is
a professor in the Theatre Department there.  --HMC]
 

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