1993

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 607.  Thursday, 30 Sept. 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Jon Enriquez <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Sep 1993 09:33:03 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0596  Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
 
(2)     From:   Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Sep 1993 0:03:30 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0604  Re: Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jon Enriquez <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Sep 1993 09:33:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0596  Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0596  Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
 
Simon Rae:
 
You're talking about a different animal, I think.  Ellen's comment
referred to the first time a black actor had been cast as a "white"
character at RSC.  Moreover, the popular impression of Robeson was
utterly unlike that of Denzel Washington; Robeson's leftist leanings
would have made him a suspicious character in that time even if he
were white.
 
Jon Enriquez
The Graduate School
Georgetown University
ENRIQUEZJ@guvax     (Bitnet)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.     (Internet)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Sep 1993 0:03:30 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0604  Re: Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0604  Re: Color-Blind and Color-Aware Casting
 
If we agree that Branagh's casting of racially different half-
brothers is made probable by Don Pedro's having an African and
Don John's a European mother, do we also think it probable that
the heir of an Iberian crown is half African?  That reminds me of
the director I spoke to once, who wanted to make *Much Ado* as
zany as possible because, he said, who ever heard of Spanish
princes ruling Sicily!  I at least think that the colonial status of
Sicily in relation to the Arragonian half-brothers is important.
However, a zany *Much Ado* worked well, as does Branagh's
delicious one (for the most part).  In this case, I prefer to accept
actors as actors, as Gabriel Egan suggested some time ago.
 
Al Cacicedo (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Albright College

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