1993

Thanks

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 574.  Wednesday, 22 Sept. 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, September 22, 1993
Subject:        Thanks
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans,
 
My wife Kathy, my elder daughter Melissa, and I  thank you all for your kind
words and thoughts regarding the birth of Rebecca Mary Elizabeth Cook.
 
Forgive me my brief moment of fatherly pride.
 
--Hardy
 
PS: The unexpected interruption was indeed the Mailer problem; I expected
Rebecca several weeks ago.

New List: ETEXTCTR

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 573.  Wednesday, 22 Sept. 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, September 22, 1993
Subject:        New List:  ETEXTCTR
 
The following announcement recently appeared on HUMANIST.
 
Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 7, No. 0193. Friday, 17 Sep 1993.
 
                    New discussion list: ETEXTCTR@RUTVM1
 
At the first Humanities Computing Summer Seminar, organized by the Center for
Electronic Texts in the Humanities in August 1992, the librarian participants
suggested that there be some way for participants and other librarians
actively developing electronic text centers to come together and share their
experiences so that all could benefit and expand their expertise.  As a result
of this suggestion, the ALA ACRL Discussion Group on Electronic Text Centers
was established in January 1993, with Marianne Gaunt (Associate University
Librarian at Rutgers University) as its Chair.  At the first meeting of this
group, in June 1993 in New Orleans, a suggestion was made and accepted to take
this further and set up an electronic discussion list for electronic text
centers.
 
This list has now been established.  Its name is ETEXTCTR (Discussion Group on
Electronic Text Centers), and will be administered from the listserv at
Rutgers University, listserv@rutvm1 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  It is a
moderated list, meant to cover broad issues: budgets, acquisitions,
cataloging, public services, management, training and staff development, etc.
but to be focused initially on full-text files that are primarily monographic
in nature rather than e-journals or numeric data files.
 
If you would like to join in with this discussion, or would like to learn from
the discussion among others, please subscribe to this list by sending a
message to
 
      listserv@rutvm1 (bitnet address)  OR
      This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (internet address)
 
Leave the subject line blank, and send as the body of the message the
following line
 
      subscribe etextctr Firstname Lastname
 
where Firstname is your first name and Lastname is your last name.
 
The minutes of the first meeting of the ALA ACRL Discussion Group on
Electronic Text Centers will be posted to this list shortly.  You may respond
to these minutes through the list, or post questions, comments or ideas on
anything related to the development of electronic text centers.  Send your
postings to
 
      etextctr@rutvm1 (bitnet)  OR
      This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
If you have any questions about this list, or problems with technicalities,
please write to the moderator, Annelies Hoogcarspel, at hoogcarspel@zodiac or
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
I look forward to a good discussion!
 
Annelies Hoogcarspel
 
P.S.  I am new at moderating a list, so please bear with me :-).
 
Center for Electronic Texts            phone:    (908) 932-1384
in the Humanities                      fax:      (908) 932-1386
169 College Avenue                     bitnet:   hoogcarspel@zodiac
New Brunswick, NJ 08903                internet: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Q: The Chorus in Shakespeare's Plays

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 571.  Wednesday, 22 Sept. 1993.
 
From:           Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Sep 1993 12:40:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Chorus in Shakespeare's Plays
 
I have been sending SHAKSPER postings along to students in my Shakespeare
class.  One young woman, who is considering in a research project on ROMEO AND
JULIET, is wondering whether the scholars on our list might send her some
information or give her some things to think about concerning the role of the
chorus in Romeo & Juliet.  She has written a discussion-preparation sheet for
class and is now interested in writing a research essay on the chorus in
Shakespeare's plays.  She has noticed detected what she calls "a choral effect"
in Richard III.  As she says, "I'm interested in what Shakespeare was trying to
do by adding this effect."  How might we help this young student?
 
Address your replies to Sarah
 
Thank you,
 
Nick Clary
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Jewish Stereotypes

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 572.  Wednesday, 22 Sept. 1993.
 
From:           Ed Pechter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Sep 1993 18:49:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 4.0561  Re: Jewish Stereotypes
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0561  Re: Jewish Stereotypes
 
Some funny & interesting & smart commentary in Philip Roth's last novel,
which was (what a coincidence) called *Operation Shylock*.

Re: Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 570.  Wednesday, 22 Sept. 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Tom Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 20 Sep 93 15:16:08 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 4.0560  Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
 
(2)     From:   Susan Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 20 Sep 1993 17:40:17 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0560 Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
 
(3)     From:   Siobhan Perricone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 20 Sep 1993 15:46:17 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Race and Casting
 
(4)     From:   Jerald Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Sep 1993 18:52:14
        Subj:   Race, and Casting
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Sep 93 15:16:08 -0400
Subject: Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
Comment:        SHK 4.0560  Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
 
Regarding what one might surmise about Kenneth Branaugh's intentions when
he cast Denzel Washington as the prince, this exact question was asked
after the screening of the film at SAA in Atlanta back in April.  For what
it's worth, the PR guy from the production company who was there to answer
questions said something to the effect of, "We took the best actors
available who were suited for the part, and race never entered into it."
 
Tom
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Sep 1993 17:40:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0560 Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0560 Denzel Washington, Race, and Casting
 
On Washington, race, and casting:
 
I'm jumping in late and this may be redundant, but I agree with the point
whoever it was made about race mattering or not mattering depending on how
nontraditional casting is used. I also don't think it is "meant" to matter
in Branagh's "Ado," any more than casting Americans for Claudio and Don
John was meant to matter. To a certain extent, though, the choice to cast
Washington would inevitably bring the audience's internalized emotions and
attitudes about race into play just as a casting decision that intended to
do so would. For instance, I think my reaction to Don Pedro being left
behind for the big dance scene was affected by the fact that he was the
only Black actor in the film.
 
I'm also interested to know if anyone remembers the National (I think it
was the National) Theater's production of "The White Devil" a couple years
ago, in which Violetta, Flamineo, and their mother and younger brother
were all Black while everyone else was white. I thought it was an odd
decision and brought in some strange resonances, particularly the mother's
speech over the younger son's dead body--what was originally a lament
about family-on-family violence started to look like a commentary on
Black-on-Black violence. Did anyone else see this production and have the
same reaction?
 
Susan Harris
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Siobhan Perricone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Sep 1993 15:46:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Race and Casting
 
When we did "A Midsummer Night's Dream" last year, we had a black Oberon
playing against a very white Titania.  They were also cast as Hippolyta
and Theseus.  It was really cool, but I don't think the director was
trying to make a political statement.
 
Hmm...
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerald Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Sep 1993 18:52:14
Subject:        Race, and Casting
 
>On the subject of race and casting, I submit that sometimes "non-realistic"
>casting is intended to make a point and sometimes it isn't.  I've heard of a
>Mississippi production of *R&J* where the Montagues are all black and the
>Capulets all white; obviously, race matters here.
 
I was in the production.  I might point out that we also had a female Tybalt.
Also our Juliet opens tonight in "LA PD Blue"  which we don't get to see in
Mississippi.
 
One interesting comment from a local cast member.  The show opened with a brawl
between black students in the local high school and white students from the
local military academy.
 
The cast member pointed out that there is no fighting between black and white
students (except for things sponsored by Mississippi Cultural Crossroads - the
organization that was responsible for R & J - there is little interaction at
all).
 
However, when the high school was all white, the high school students fought
the military school students all of the time. The racial conflicts are
expressed in quite different ways.
 
I guess that the point of my comments is that, while it was a really amazing
production with great original music, I'm not sure that the white vs. black
aspect of the show really worked.
 
Jerry Bangham
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