1993

Re: Audio Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 498.  Friday, 20 August 1993.
 
From:           David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Aug 1993 16:44:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0485  Re: Audio Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0485  Re: Audio Shakespeare
 
I have been an avid listener to audio Shakespeare for many years.  Don't
know if the recordings I will mention are still in print, but I am certain
they are available, as Tad Davis mentioned, in used book and record stores.
Especially good in the Caedmon series--in addition to those Tad Davis
mentioned--are *Coriolanus* with Richard Burton and Jessica Tandy.
I can't read *Coriolanus* without hearing Burton's voice.  Also *The Winter's
Tale* with John Gielgud as Leontes, George Rose as Autolycus and Peggy
Ashcroft as Paulina.  The Olivier-Smith-Finlay *Othello* has been recorded,
as has the older (1943) Robeson-Hagen *Othello*.  It is fascinating to
compare and contrast these vintage performances.  Robeson is surprisingly
restrained and dignified, while Hagen's sexuality (she was in her early
twenties at the time) astonishes the listener (at least this listener.)
In the 'thirties, a series of hour-long Shakespeare broadcasts with Hollywood
stars went out over the radio.  These have also been recorded and released
in a box set.  They include Humphrey Bogart as Hotspur, Orson Welles as
Orsino, and a *Much Ado* with Leslie Howard and Rosalind Russell--not to
to forget an Edward G. Robinson Petruchio.  Each play takes an hour or less,
so purists will tremble at the abridgement.  Nonetheless, the performances
make for a fascinating document in a previous generation's approach to
Shakespearean acting.
 
David Richman

Re: Travelling Troupes

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 497.  Friday, 20 August 1993.
 
From:           Zanne Westfall Pardee <WS#This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Aug 93 15:12:19 EDT
Subject: 4.0492 Q: Travelling Troupes
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0492 Q: Travelling Troupes
 
I wrote about travelling troupes from a somewhat earlier period in
*Patrons and Performance*, 1990 OUP.  This may be of some help to your
student.  Suzanne Westfall WS#This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: *The Tempest* by the Sea

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 495.  Wednesday, 18 August 1993.
 
From:           Peter Ayers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Aug 1993 09:14:39 -0400
Subject:        *The Tempest*
 
To answer Kevin Berland's query, the incidental music for this production
was not the marvellous Figgy Duff, but omni-purpose Vivaldi-esque stuff.
It wouldn't much matter what was used, since the pounding of the surf
against the cliffs tends to reduce its importance most of the time.
 
Peter Ayers
Memorial University

The Everyman Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 496.  Thursday, 19 August 1993.
 
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Aug 93 9:41:56 EDT
Subject:        The Everyman Shakespeare
 
Time to put on my cheerleader's hat again and congratulate J.M. Dent on
the new Everyman Shakespeare, edited by John F. Andrews. I found the texts
of four of the plays in the campus bookstore yesterday, and immediately
started in on Macbeth. The text is that of the 1990 Guild Shakespeare from
Doubleday (something else I missed in my travels), with revisions;
copiously annotated on facing pages, with chronology, foreword by a noted
theatre professional (Zoe Caldwell in the case of Macbeth), introduction
and brief history of the criticism of the play.
 
I find the notes helpful, pointing out not only meanings but possible
stage business and parallels to other passages in the same play (many of
which I'd missed in the case of Macbeth). But the really remarkable thing
is the text itself: it's both conservative and radical -- conservative
because it conserves, without emendation, many of the original Folio
readings (and presumably Quarto readings for plays that have one); and
radical for the same reason. I admit I have a fondness for offbeat textual
analysis, and it's not an area where I have any expertise at all. But I
admire the daring that prints Macbeth's famous line in its original form:
"I dare do all that may become a Man; / Who dares no more is none." I
don't find this line as incomprehensible as most editors of Shakespeare,
who have been unable to keep their hands off it. I can't wait to see what
happens to the sleaded pole-axe on the ice.
 
In passing, I would also like to salute one of my favorite lines: "Though
his Bark cannot be lost, / Yet it shall be Tempest-tost." There's something
about this that is, as so often in Shakespeare, so perfectly put that I
can't help laughing with delight whenever I read it.
 
Tad Davis
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*Shakespeare and the Classroom*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 494.  Wednesday, 18 August 1993.
 
From:           Tom Blackburn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Aug 1993 11:23:30 +0000
Subject:        Shakespeare and the Classroom
 
Colleagues,
 
        I want to call to your attention a new "mini-journal," <Shakespeare
and the Classroom>. Edited by Herb Coursen, the journal's first issue was
published this spring. Herb solicits notice of productions and conferences,
book reviews in the area of teaching Shakespeare, abstracts of articles on
teaching the bard, brief essays on new approaches and program for teachers,
input from College and University teachers, from Secondary Schools and from
theatres. Two issues a year are planned; subscriptions are $4 to Eve
McManus, Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH 45810. Editorial queries to H.
R. Coursen, English Dept., Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011.
 
Cheers, Tom Blackburn
 
Tom Blackburn
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