1993

Re: Computers and Shakespeare Studies

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 472.  Saturday, 31 July 1993.
 
From:           Tom Blackburn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Jul 1993 11:39:21 +0000
Subject: 4.0467  Q: Computers and Shakespeare Studies
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0467  Q: Computers and Shakespeare Studies
 
>My dissertation work in part involves a consideration of the impact of
>electronic textuality upon Shakespearean scholarship. Consequently, I would be
>extremely grateful to hear from anyone who makes use of computer multimedia in
>their work.  Even a short note would be much appreciated.
 
Jeff,
        With my research assistant Melissa Shaner, I have just completed a
hypercard stack which presents four different rendition of two soliloquies
each from Hamlet and Macbeth in QuickTime movies digitized from video with
Video Spigot and Adobe Premiere software. With the movies the stack takes
more than 200 megabytes, so we have to run it from servers at the moment.
I intend to use the stack in classes and seminars to work on notions of the
relation between script and production choices and on issues of
interpretation as illuminated by those choices.
 
Tom Blackburn, Department of English, Swarthmore College
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Computers; *Henry V*; "Moonlighting"; SSE Contest

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 471.  Friday, 30 July 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 11:47:15 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0467  Q: Computers and Shakespeare Studies
 
(2)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 13:01:46 -0400
        Subj:   Henry 5
 
(3)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 09:06:21 -500 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0457 Re: "Moonlighting" Episode
 
(4)     From:   Mark Sandona <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 10:35:52 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0449  SSE Contest; *SQ* Teaching Shakespeare Issue
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 11:47:15 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 4.0467  Q: Computers and Shakespeare Studies
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0467  Q: Computers and Shakespeare Studies
 
>My dissertation work in part involves a consideration of the impact of
>electronic textuality upon Shakespearean scholarship. Consequently, I would be
>extremely grateful to hear from anyone who makes use of computer multimedia in
>their work.  Even a short note would be much appreciated.
 
Jeff:
 
I can't help directly, but perhaps indirectly... at this year's ATHE
conference, there will be a panel entitled "Developing Multimedia
Learning Aids for the Study of Shakespeare".  It features primarily
(though not exclusively) some folks from the U. of South Dakota:
Ronald Moyer and Cheryl Feight.  You might want to contact them
directly.
 
Rick Jones
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 13:01:46 -0400
Subject:        Henry 5
 
Just a note to add to the debate about Henry: someone (sorry, I forget who)
recently posted the claim that Henry doesn't lie.  But as Katherine shrewdly
points out, "de tongues of de mans is be full of deceits"!  Among Henry's
notable whoppers is the promise that "he today that sheds his blood with
me/Shall be my brother" etc.--after the battle, the "conditions" of people like
Pistol are clearly not "gentled." (Is it fit this soldier keep his oath?). And
instead of challenging Williams directly as he promises ("If ever I live to see
it...") Henry sets up Fluellen--with a lie--to cudgel him by proxy.
 
          Come, come, a better instance say I!
 
 
        Jean Peterson
        Bucknell University
 
(3)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 09:06:21 -500 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0457 Re: "Moonlighting" Episode
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0457 Re: "Moonlighting" Episode
 
        The inquiry about the "Moonlighting" Episode of ^Shr.^ probably
doesn't have a satisfactory answer. I suspect that ABC-TV is the place to
begin but it in turn may not own the rights outright. They may belong to
the original sponsor of the show, transmitted on Nov. 25, 1986, from "an
idea by William Budd." Perhaps even the actors share in the ownership. The
result can be a tangle. See Jack Oruch's review of this spritely
performance, which is politically correct in its feminist slant, in
^Shakespeare on Film Newsletter^ 11.2 (April 1987). If only it were as
simple to use film and video for research and teaching purposes as it is
to use books. Perhaps one day it will be.  Ken Rothwell
 
(4)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Sandona <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 10:35:52 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0449  SSE Contest; *SQ* Teaching Shakespeare Issue
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0449  SSE Contest; *SQ* Teaching Shakespeare Issue
 
I think "Season of ..." will prove to be an unwieldy paradigm.  I'd choose
a phrase from MND:
 
                        BY ANOTHER'S EYES
 
Mark Sandona
Hood College

Re: French in *Henry V* (Mortimer)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 469.  Thursday, 29 July 1993.
 
From:           Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 1:16:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0463  Re: Henry V's French
Comment:        RE: SHK 4.0463  Re: Henry V's French
 
     On Herb Donow's remarks on Mortimer as one of Shakespeare's
"ideal heroes" because he wishes to learn how to communicate with
his wife, I'd urge everyone to read Matthew Wikander's *The Play of
Truth and State:  Historical Drama from Shakespeare to Brecht* (Johns
Hopkins, 1986), who argues that Mortimer is literally bewitched by
Glendower, and that his marriage to Glendower's daughter presents
the moral folly of rebellion as a parallel to Hotspur's political folly in
the same scene.  The argument involves complex analyses of the
play, to which I cannot do justice here.  Phyllis Rakin, whose discussion
of Mortimer in *Stages of History:  Shakespeare's English Chronicles*
(Cornell, 1990) refers to Wikander's book, also puts in question the
ideality of Mortimer's "heroism":  "His manhood lost to female
enchantment,the heir of Richard II never appears on the fields of
battle where English history is made" (171)
 
Just a-reading in Reading, PA
 
Al Cacicedo (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Albright College

Re: Boys Playing Women

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 470.  Friday, 30 July 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 93  15:50 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 4.0448  Re: Boys Playing Women
 
(2)     From:   Helen Whall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 14:02:04 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   more on boys' voices
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: Thursday, 29 Jul 93  15:50 BST
Subject: 4.0448  Re: Boys Playing Women
Comment: RE: SHK 4.0448  Re: Boys Playing Women
 
 
I can't see any reason why the males who played women in Shakespeare's plays
shouldn't have been mature men. Perfectly satisfactory careers as 'female
impersonators' are common in a number of theatrical traditions -eg the
Japanese. It's worth bearing in mind too that the term 'boy' could then carry
the implication of 'servant' or 'slave' even for mature males -a usage that
persists here and there in the modern world. Hence Cleopatra's complaint about
the squeaking actor and, more interestingly, Coriolanus' extreme reaction when
the term is applied to him.
 
Terence Hawkes, University of Wales, Cardiff
 
PS There's also the tradition of Pantomime in British theatre, in which
-to this day- the 'Dame' is played by a man (and of course the part of
Principal Boy is played by a woman).
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Whall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jul 1993 14:02:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        more on boys' voices
 
As usual, Phyllis Rackin's fine ear for Shakespearean voices locates yet
another interesting textual pressure point.  But rather than ending the
discussion on boy actors, women's voices and Renaissance musical
training/knowledge, might not the *Coriolanus* passage point us back toward
metadramatic moments less complicated by the layers of parody which shroud
Bottom, Flute, and even Cleopatra's fears of a squeaking boy?  (I still think
these deserve comment, by the way).  We do have Viola's initial decision in
*Twelfth Night* to disguise herself as a eunuch, as well as the Duke's oddly
strained request that Cesario sing a song (II.iv)--a song which in fact Feste
must be summoned to sing.  In the instance of a boy playing a girl playing a
boy, this seems, if nothing else, like some kind of theatrical smoke and mirror
game.  Perhaps such references blur the line between a boy's voice--or a female
impersonator's, if such there were on the Renaissance stage--and a woman's.
But if so, a perceived need to blur seems implicit.
 
Most assuredly, we cannot know what kind of acting conventions were employed by
actors to convey their varied roles, male and female, but that vocal
manipulation was important does seem amply justified by yet another metadramtic
moment in *Twelfth Night*.  In IV.ii, we watch how an actor prepares to double
a role.  In playing Sir Topas for Malvolio, Feste dawns a new gown and a beard,
despite the fact that Malvolio cannot see him.  He then moves in and out of his
Topas/Feste voices to interview Malvolio.  (At the end of the play, Feste will
remind us of the importance of "vox").  Perhaps *King Lear* is even more
self-reflexive. Gloucester, after all, almost "Hears through" Edgar's disguise
in the suicide/rescue scene.  Voices would seem to change on Shakespeare's
stage, even if we cannot be sure what happened after a boy actor's voice did
so.

OSF 1994 Playbill

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 468.  Thursday, 29 July 1993.
 
From:           Thomas A. Berson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jul 1993 14:42:02 -0700
Subject:        OSF 1994 Playbill
 
Fellow SHAKSPERians,
 
Here is a preliminary look at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's playbill
for the 1994 season. This playbill, like any playbill, is subject to
change.
 
At Ashland
----------
On the Elizabethan Stage (outdoors, a modern version of the Wooden O,
seats 1200): *The Tempest*, *Much Ado About Nothing*, and *Two Noble
Kinsmen*.
 
In the Angus Bowmer Theater (600 seats): *Hamlet*, Moss Hart and George
S. Kaufman's *You Can't Take It With You*, Allan Cubitt's *The Pool of
Bethesda*, Lanford Wilson's *Fifth of July*, and Jean Anouilh's *The
Rehearsal*.
 
In the Black Swan Theater (140 seat black box, intimate): David Mamet's
*Oleanna*, George C. Wolfe's *The Colored Museum*, and one play still to
be announced.
 
Other activities include OSF Institute symposia and workshops for
teachers and students.
 
At Portland
-----------
Brian Friel's *Dancing at Lughnasa*, Pierre Corneille's (adopted by Tony
Kushner) *The Illusion*, *The Comedy of Errors*, Lanford Wilson's *Fifth
of July*, and Cheryl L. West's *Jar the Floor*.
 
-----------
For further information or to get on the mailing list contact the box at
(503) 482-4331.
 
See you there,
--Tom Berson

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