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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: July ::
Re: *Cardenio* MS
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 424.  Tuesday, 13 July 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Larry Schwartz <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jul 93 13:07:40 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0423  More Info on Reported *Cardenio* MS?
 
(2)     From:   Robert O'Connor <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Jul 1993 09:44:36 +0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0421  *Cardenio*
 
(3)     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Jul 93 19:41:41 EDT
        Subj:   Cardenio
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Schwartz <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jul 93 13:07:40 CDT
Subject: 4.0423  More Info on Reported *Cardenio* MS?
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0423  More Info on Reported *Cardenio* MS?
 
Some sketchy details about Charles Hamilton, as drawn from the 1976
_Current Biography_ yearbook, pp. 171-173
 
Born Dec. 24, 1913
Address:  Charles Hamilton Galleries, Inc., 25 E. 77th St., NYC.
 
Noted dealer of autographs.  The first autograph he collected was that of
Rudyard Kipling.  Translated the _Aeneid_ into English blank verse while a
student at Beverly HIlls High School (long before it became "90210").  Became
the first student in UCLA's English department to complete all of the work for
the M.A. in one year. Founded Charles Hamilton Autographs, Inc. in 1953. Has
written several books, including (most germane to this list) "In Search of
Shakespeare:  a reconaissance into the poet's life and handwriting" (San Diego:
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985).  One of the more interesting claims made by
Hamilton in this book was that, during the writing of the will, Shakespeare
suffered a stroke.  This claim was based upon the change in the style of
orthography of the document. Hamilton was also one of the first authoritative
debunkers of the Hitler diary forgeries.
 
larry schwartz, humanities librarian
north dakota state university
fargo, nd
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert O'Connor <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Jul 1993 09:44:36 +0700
Subject: 4.0421  *Cardenio*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0421  *Cardenio*
 
I recently saw a book advertised as "Shakespeare's Lost Play", but that was
a text of "Edmund Ironside". I suppose we shall have to wait for a
'Collected Un-Works' (with "Two Noble Kinsmen" and "Woodstock" as well)
before we can judge for ourselves!
 
ROC
**********************
*  Robert F. O'Connor
*  
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*  English Department
*  Australian National University
**********************
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Jul 93 19:41:41 EDT
Subject:        Cardenio
 
I read the news reports about Charles Hamilton and "Cardenio," but they
were sketchy. Here's what I gather, though: (1) the play itself wasn't
really "found," right? It was a known manuscript, just not something that
was officially classed in the canon. (2) the comparison was made on the
basis of the handwriting in Shakespeare's will (not just the signatures
but the actual text of the will itself). To accept this you have to accept
Hamilton's controversial thesis that Shakespeare wrote his own will. This
was detailed in his book "In Search of Shakespeare" of a few years ago --
the one that suggested Thomas Quiney may have hastened Shakespeare's end
with a little "inheritance powder" (i.e. arsenic). I found his analysis of
the handwriting in the will fascinating, especially where he creates a
"signature" by pasting together letters from the will and comparing them
to known signatures. But it would be safe to say the jury is still out on
that one, wouldn't it?
 
In other words Hamilton took a known artifact and reinterpreted it against
"evidence" which is itself a reinterpretation. Which doesn't mean he isn't
right.
 
Tad Davis

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