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Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: June ::
Re: Collier Query
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 392.  Friday, 25 June 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jun 1993 10:51:08 -500 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0385 Collier Query
 
(2)     From:   Nick Clary <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Jun 1993 12:37:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   John Payne Collier, 1789-1883, ed.
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Jun 1993 10:51:08 -500 (EDT)
Subject: 4.0385 Collier Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0385 Collier Query
 
Dear Kathryn Anderson,
 
Just for starters, you could look at S. Schoenbaum's >Shakespeare's Lives<
(Oxford: Clarendon, 1970), 348-61, where with his usual wit and irony,
Schoenbaum recounts the melancholy and dismal tale.  Ken Rothwell
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Jun 1993 12:37:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        John Payne Collier, 1789-1883, ed.
 
If your library has a sufficiently powerful microfiche reader and a copy of
THE MICROBOOK LIBRARY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (PART I: BEGINNINGS TO 1660), which
is a valuable resource for those whose institutional collections are limited,
you may be happy to discover 37 separate titles edited by John Payne Collier,
including reprints of many rare early texts gathered under a single cover for
the first time.  Others have already provided additional suggestions, but you
will surely be delighted by what you find in Collier's many introductions,
notes, comparisons, and interpretive accounts.  In the 1840's, particularly,
the number of publications under his editorship is staggering.  Collier, as
you must know already, was not his own worst or his only critic.
 
 
Nick Clary

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