1994

Michigan Fest; 1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0707.  Wednesday, 31 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 94 16:39:37 EST
        Subj:   Michigan Fest
 
(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 20:35:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 94 16:39:37 EST
Subject:        Michigan Fest
 
Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan (just outside Grand
Rapids) is holding a Shakespeare Festival, September 23 to October 2, 1994.
 
MND will be produced, acted by college students and two pros. We'll have a
number of film showings, with discussions of film/theater differences. There'll
be garden performances of scenes and Shakespeare spin-offs. John Andrews will
be lecturing and visiting classes. Some Renaissance music and a Renaissance
dinner finale.
 
Please stop in, if you're in the area. I can send a full schedule by snail mail
to anyone who is interested.
 
Ron Dwelle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 20:35:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference
 
I just received a letter from Sam Crowl, Ohio University, who is organizing the
1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference. The dates for the Conference are now set: May
11-13, 1995. Phyllis Rackin and Janet Adelman are the featured speakers.
Unfortunately, I do not have the official topic for the Conference. Perhaps, if
Phyllis is reading this, she can help me.
 
For further information, write directly to:
 
Sam Crowl
Department of English
Ohio University
Athens, OH 45701-2979
 
Yours,
Bill Godshalk

Re: Shrews; Natural Death (Greenblatt Argument)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0706.  Wednesday, 31 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 16:11:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shrews in SHREW
 
(2)     From:   Judiana Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Aug 1994 13:41:04 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0704 Re: Natural Deaths
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 16:11:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shrews in SHREW
 
David Schalkwyk is certainly right in saying there is more than one shrew in
SHREW, but I'd added a few more -- at least. Bianca is a closet shrew,
or, perhaps, her suitors don't seem to notice her words of cool command. If
Petruchio is a shrew, then possibly the nameless lord also has a touch of
shrewishness. Tranio is surely shrewd; is he a shrew as well? Tranio is "tamed"
by the end of the play, put back in his place as servant. Perhaps Shakespeare
should have named the play SHREWS ABOUNDING.
 
And David's vision of Petruchio and Katherine (or Kate?) uniting to hoodwink
conventional society is possible. Given that vision of the last scene, a
director would have to play down the potential violence of Petruchio's "taming"
of his wife. Petruchio would have to be played, during the taming scenes, as a
kind of humours character who is "odd," but not vicious. And, I suppose, given
his initial entrance into the play (and the contrasting entrance of Lucentio),
Petruchio has potential as a humourous gentleman -- who is looking for a wife
to match him.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judiana Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Aug 1994 13:41:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0704 Re: Natural Deaths
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0704 Re: Natural Deaths
 
From a fellow South African working in Rochester, New York: I'm afraid you did
not get a Greenblatt scoop.  I heard what sounds like the same paper at the
annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America three years ago in
Vancouver.  I remember finding it fascinating but I couldn't paraphrase it.
There was something Geertzian in there about a belief in some remote corner
that an enemy can eat one's soul, which Greenblatt somehow applied to
Shakespeare.
 
Best,
Dia Lawrence

Re: Natural Deaths; Shrew(d)ness

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0704.  Tuesday, 30 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Aug 94 09:36:57 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0693  Re: Generic Expectations (Death by Natural
 
(2)     From:   David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Aug 94 10:03:38 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0692  Re: PC and ACT *Shrew*s
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Aug 94 09:36:57 SAST-2
Subject: 5.0693  Re: Generic Expectations (Death by Natural
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0693  Re: Generic Expectations (Death by Natural
 
I think I've got myself into a bit of a mess here, but I'll try to return
Bill's service.   I'm not sure that I would be doing Stephen Greenblatt a
service by trying to recount what I heard in an hour-long lecture some months
ago.  I was simply wondering whether anyone has heard him on the topic of death
in Shakespeare elsewhere. Perhaps we in South Africa were blessed with a
Greenblatt "scoop"! *As far as I remember*, Stephen was suggesting that even
"natural" deaths in Shakespeare are all (or almost all?) presented as being the
outcome of the actions of the person's life.  I've already said too much, and
perhaps should wait until Greenblatt publishes the essay or disseminates the
idea more freely.
 
David
University of Cape Town
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Aug 94 10:03:38 SAST-2
Subject: 5.0692  Re: PC and ACT *Shrew*s
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0692  Re: PC and ACT *Shrew*s
 
Kate is, of course, like Beatrice in _Much Ado_ both "shrew" and "shrewd".  I'd
like to think that the latter is the result of the former.  If one takes the
gender-neutrality of "shrew" seriously, then of course Sly is the first shrew
in the play, Kate the second, and Petruchio the third and most consummate one.
What I find interesting about this play is the way in which the notion of
shrew(d)ness, the social nature of comedy and the relations of characters to
their society are interrogated.  Whatever one's view of the psychology of the
action (and I'm entirely sympathetic with those who feel revulsion at the
mental and physical torture that Kate is forced to endure)  the structure of
the play offers a strange view by which shrew(d)ness (being both insight into
the nature of a society and its rejection) offers a way to transcend the kind
of ideological incorporation that comedy as a genre involves. What kind of
ending do we have?  Is there any other Shakespearean comedy in which only two
out of six "city copulatives" make it to bed in the end?  There is nearly a
disaster at the end of _Merchant_, but for at least all the heterosexual
couples consummation as act and symbol is finally achieved.  The point is
surely not that Kate wins out against Petruchio (and men) in the end by only
pretending to acquiesce, but rather that Kate and Petruchio win out against a
society they both despise.  That's the fantasy offered by the strange,
etiolated comic structure of the play.  It may not be any more PC than other
interpretations, but it draws the lines in different places, and is more
interesting (I think) because it circumvents many of the old questions.
 
I'd be happy to have any responses to this very sketchy view, since it is the
basis of an essay I'm writing at the moment, and it would be good to get either
some encouragement or firm indications that it's rubbish.  One is rather
isolated down here.
 
David Schalkwyk
University of Cape Town

Qs: *Err.* Research; Hamlet Trial; Holme Citations

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0705.  Wednesday, 31 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Miola <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 14:35:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   [Q: *Err.* Research]
 
(2)     From:   Leslie Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, Aug 30 13:58:45 EDT 1994
        Subj:   Hamlet Trial
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 21:24:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Randle Holme
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Miola <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 14:35:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        [Q: *Err.* Research]
 
Am editing The Comedy of Errors volume for the Garland Critical Essays series
and would like to know of any interesting work being done on the play.  My
e-mail address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Thanks.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Harris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, Aug 30 13:58:45 EDT 1994
Subject:        Hamlet Trial
 
Hi, Folks.
 
I was talking to a colleague in our Math Department, and he told me about a
program he saw on television (most likely on PBS) relating to _Hamlet_.  On
that program, several Supreme Court justices debated the issue of whether
Hamlet was guilty of murder as a result of his actions during the play.
Questions of intentionality and of Hamlet's sanity came up, as they always do
when discussing the play.
 
Has anyone seen that program, and would you know how to acquire copies of it?
I'm teaching _Hamlet_ in a course this semester, and I think the video would
be a great way to stir discussion.
 
Thanks for your help.
 
Leslie Harris
Susquehanna University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 21:24:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Randle Holme
 
Recently, I've spent some time reading around in Randle Holme's ACADEMY OF
ARMORY, OR, STOREHOUSE OF ARMORY AND BLAZON (Chester, 1688), a volume that has
something for everyone. In the Second Book (paginated independently), I found a
section on gilliflowers (Shakespeare's "Gilly-vors," WINTER'S TALE 4.4.82).
Holme records two rather suggestive names for "Gilliflowers mixed with red and
white": "The painted Lady" and "Crown of Bohemia" (p 64, H4v).
 
In THE WINTER'S TALE, Polixenes, who normally wears the crown of Bohemia,
argues that Perdita should cultivate the flowers. She responds: "Ile not
put/The Dible in earth, to set one slip of them:/No more then were I painted, I
would wish/This youth should say 'twer well" (1623 Folio, Hinman, TLN 1912-15).
Obviously an allusion to "the painted Lady"?
 
Were these names for the gilliflower available to Shakespeare? It's attempting
to think so. Or did the names develop from Shakespeare's play, proving the
popularity of WT in the seventeenth century? Or is this merely a coincidence?
 
I've check Pafford's Arden edition and, after a quick reading of footnotes and
appendix, I can't find a reference to these names.
 
And, to change the subject completely in Book Three, Holme has a section on
seventeenth-century printing (a subject he would know first hand) with
definitions and social customs (pp. 113ff., P1r). I can't recall seeing Holme
cited very frequently as a source on this subject. Am I wrong?
 
The Scolar Press reprinted THE ACADEMY in 1972.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Q: Player Dialogue

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0703.  Sunday, 28 August 1994.
 
From:           Judie Porter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Aug 1994 8:53:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Hamlet
 
I am new to the SHAKSPER LISTSERV, but would like to ask the following
question.  Does anyone know of a study of Hamlet that includes a comprehensive
explication of the Player King-Player Queen dialogues (III.ii.155-228)?
 
Thanks,
Judie Porter, Media Specialist, Portsmouth Schools, R.I.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.