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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: August ::
Re: Computers; Trains; Lines; Joyce List; *MND*;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0661.  Monday, 8 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   James Harner <
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        Date:   Friday, 5 Aug 1994 9:28:48 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0653  Shakespeare and Computers
 
(2)     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Friday, 05 Aug 94 15:14:25 EDT
        Subj:   Train service to Stratford
 
(3)     From:   Peter Paolucci <
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        Date:   Friday, 5 Aug 1994 15:30:34 -0400
        Subj:   Prose & Verse
 
(4)     From:   Lee A. Jacobus <
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        Date:   Saturday, 06 Aug 94 16:36:01 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0429  Re: Character; Masks; Double-Casting
 
(5)     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Sunday, 07 Aug 1994 18:54:01 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0657  Re: Directing *MND*
 
(6)     From:   Piers Lewis <
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        Date:   Sunday, 07 Aug 1994 08:23:42 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   S.112
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Harner <
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Date:           Friday, 5 Aug 1994 9:28:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0653  Shakespeare and Computers
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0653  Shakespeare and Computers
 
An addition to the list:
 
+World Shakespeare Bibliography on CD-ROM 1900-Present, edited by
James L. Harner. Cambridge UP, 1995-. The first disk, covering 1990-93, is
scheduled for 1995.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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Date:           Friday, 05 Aug 94 15:14:25 EDT
Subject:        Train service to Stratford
 
Since accurate train and bus schedules are apparently covered by the Official
Secrets Act many of you will be as surprised as I was to learn that Thames
Trains recently began direct train service from London's Paddington Station to
Stratford-upon-Avon.
 
Their trains cost considerably less than the old train/bus "Shakespeare
Connection" via Coventry that even the RSC box office is still likely to tell
you is the only way to get there.
 
The earliest trains leave Paddington Mon-Sat morning at 9:18 and arrive in
Stratford about 11:30.  There are afternoon trains at 1:48pm and 4:50pm.  For
evening trains check a schedule.  There are no trains to Stratford on Sunday,
but there is a train back at 4:45 Sunday afternoon if you would like to stay
over a weekend.  (A new schedule goes into effect 25 September 94 that includes
a train/bus combo for Sundays.)  Weekday evenings you can catch a bus across
the street from the RSC after the evening show that will take you to the 11:15
train, but you must take a bus all the way back to London on Saturdays if you
miss the 7:33 train.
 
The Thames Trains go via Ealing Broadway, Slough, Maidenhead, Reading, Oxford,
Banbury, Leamington Spa and Warwick.  At Reading they connect with trains from
Heathrow and Gatwick Airports if you would like to go straight from the plane
to the theaters.
 
The cost from Paddington is 17 pounds for an Adult Day Return (8.50 for a
child), 8 quid less than the old train/bus combo.  So unless your trip to
Stratford just wouldn't be complete without that twenty minute bus ride from
Coventry ring Thames Trains at 071-262-6767 for details or pick up a schedule
at Paddington station.  As I said above, a new schedule goes into effect in
late September.
 
The bus connection from the theater to Stratford station is run by the same
company that runs the bus from Coventry and the local scenic bus tours.  For an
additional 4 quid ( 2.50 child ) you can get the bus tour of the local sights,
including Ann Hathaway's immortal thatched roof, added to your day return
ticket.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Paolucci <
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Date:           Friday, 5 Aug 1994 15:30:34 -0400
Subject:        Prose & Verse
 
I was interested in Gareth Euridge's predicament which arose from explaining
to a student that Shakespearean prose is (usually) spoken by lower characters
and verse by social superiors.  There are interesting parallels which also
emerge in the study of Shakespearean language through syllabic meter.  If the
decasyllabic line is a norm, how do we make sense of truncated (9 syllable)
lines or tumbling (11 syllable) lines or Alexandrines?  Clearly, shifts in
the *level of language* (prose, verse, blank verse) are like shifts in
*syllabic counts* (ie) more often that not they both signal, indicate or
mirror others kinds of shifts in *content*. Stylistic analysis must always,
in the final analysis, be context sensitive (although empirical stylists
would undoubtedly disagree with me).
 
There are some strategies however, that might prove helpful in encouraging
students to think about what they read.  How many lines of prose/verse/blank
verse (or decasyllabic, tumbling or truncated lines) does a particular
character *normally* speak? What percentage of a character's lines are
delivered in this (or that) particular way? Does the shift from one level of
language (or syllabic count) vary in public or private speeches? does it vary
according to whom that character is speaking? to what extent does the content
have any impact on the style of delivery (do characters who tell lies abandon
their normal mode of speaking?)
 
Then of course there are plays like *RII* which is  stylistically homogeneous
because it is (almost) entirely in blank verse. Most "principles" of |stylistic
analysis (gleaned from other plays and abstracted into generalities) have to go
out the window in this play.
 
In short, what I'm suggesting is that the *meaning* of shifts in levels of
language (or syllabic stresses for that matter) can be determined by the
established precedents that a) the characters themselves set as we watch them
in different settings with different kinds of people or b) other characters
around them set.  *Meaning* comes through adherence to (and departure from)
these larger patterns of speech in the individual character and in the play
as a whole and of course, from what the larger issues in the play might be.
 
Peter Paolucci
York University, Toronto
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee A. Jacobus <
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Date:           Saturday, 06 Aug 94 16:36:01 EDT
Subject: 5.0429  Re: Character; Masks; Double-Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0429  Re: Character; Masks; Double-Casting
 
This is to Matthew Vail Smith.  There is a Joyce list.  One is Joyce@es.
unizh.ch (Fritz Senn) and is the Zurich Joyce institute.  Another is FWAke at
Trinity College Dublin.  Sorry, I cannot remember its address, but a search of
the lists will give it to you.  The Wake list is very busy and I ultimately
logged off because I am not now working on the Wake and the listers were
explicating it page by page.  There is yet another Joyce list, but I do not
have its address at the moment.  Good luck.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Sunday, 07 Aug 1994 18:54:01 +1000
Subject: 5.0657  Re: Directing *MND*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0657  Re: Directing *MND*
 
To Professor Williams, I have just directed a University production of MND and
must agree with both David Richman and Arthur Pearson in their suggestions. I
would, however, claim that the lovers are not the buffoons that some
productions make them. We discovered the horror that Helena suffers in the
wood; she came to woo and ends up being molested. The performance was uncut and
ran for 3 hours and 20 minutes. The mechanicals, I believe, had integrity and
during the performance of P & T's tragedy worked the tragedy rather than the
comedy which naturally occurred through the staging. Oberon, Titania, Puck and
the fairies were very sensual and to this end we doubled Oberon with Theseus
and Titania with Hippolyta. The production was such a success (it sold out)
that it will be restaged for the Melbourne Fringe Festival in October.
 
Good luck,
Scott Crozier
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Piers Lewis <
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Date:           Sunday, 07 Aug 1994 08:23:42 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        S.112
 
Here's some interesting information, for those of you who are hanging on every
word of this discussion.  Thom Gunn says (TLS, 7/29) John Berryman anticipated
Barbara Everett, re the Greene- "ore-greene" connection, by almost 60 years, in
"Shakespeare at thirty" (1935), reprinted in -The Freedom of the Poet_.
 
Piers Lewis
 

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