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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: August ::
Re: *MV*; Summer Reading; Generic Expectations
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0678.  Sunday, 14 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Aug 1994 22:47:47 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0674  Re: *MV*
 
(2)     From:   Hope A. Greenberg <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Aug 1994 16:59:39 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0676 Spinoffs: Summer Reading
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Aug 1994 23:04:14 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0674  Re: Generic Expectations
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Aug 1994 22:47:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0674  Re: *MV*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0674  Re: *MV*
 
I would like to add two points to John Gardiner's comments on MERCHANT OF
VENICE. (1) "Merchant" was a term of abuse in the 16th century. Nashe in
CHRIST'S TEARS writes: "when any man hath cosened or gone beyonde us [we say]
hee hath playde the merchant with us" (from Farmer and Henley). So in one sense
a "merchant" was a cheat, and that definition fits into the play also.
 
(2) Shylock does not say, "O, my ducats! O, my daughter" (Bevington 2.8.15).
Solanio says these words and claims that he has heard Shylock say them. Do we
trust Solanio to quote Shylock correctly?  I don't.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hope A. Greenberg <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Aug 1994 16:59:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0676 Spinoffs: Summer Reading
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0676 Spinoffs: Summer Reading
 
> SHAKSPERians in search of some light, entertaining summer reading might enjoy
> the collection of short stories entitled *Weird Tales from Shakespeare*, ed.
 
...and oddly enough I just came across a place on the Web that sells it.
The Future Fantasy Bookstore at:
 
http://www.commerce.digital.com/palo-alto/FutureFantasy/home.html
 
------------
Hope Greenberg            
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
University of Vermont     http://moose.uvm.edu/~hag
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Aug 1994 23:04:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0674  Re: Generic Expectations
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0674  Re: Generic Expectations
 
Following Dave Evett's comments on Renaissance generic expectations (5.0674), I
would like to ask a question about 16th and 17th century titlepages. When
George Eld printed TROILUS AND CRESSIDA (1609), he printed two different
titlepages for the quarto, and on both titlepages TROILUS AND CRESSIDA is
called a "history." I can't remember ever seeing the play grouped with the
histories in a 20th century collection, although you could argue that it was
grouped with the histories in the Folio (1623).  The play was first intended to
be placed solidly with the tragedies, but now has an anomalous place between
HENRY VIII and CORIOLANUS. Why it was moved and placed here, we can only
conjecture.
 
But if the Renaissance was very conscious of genre, should we pay more
attention to the designations of the titlepages in determining genre?  Is
TROILUS really a "history"? And did Jaggard, Hemings, and Condell move  the
play not because of some  copyright dispute, but because they had misplaced it
among the tragedies?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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