1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0691.  Monday, 22 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Chris Langland-Shula <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 20 Aug 1994 14:58:20 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   ACT's "Shrew"
 
(2)     From:   Mike Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 Aug 1994 08:35:08 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0688 Moonlighting *Shrew*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Langland-Shula <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 20 Aug 1994 14:58:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        ACT's "Shrew"
 
I was particularly impressed with a videotape of ACT's 1978 (I think)
production of "Shrew".  It had enough energy and physicality to carry (in my
mind) a rather bulky plot, and make the characters actions make sense in this
strange little world they inhabited.
 
If anyone has a copy of this (I saw it in a class, and alas, it was rather
scratchy), I would love to get my hands on it.  After seeing endless dreary,
disturbing, or just plain stupid bits of "Shrew" done in various scene classes,
it would be wonderfully refreshing.
 
Thanks!
 
Chris L-S
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Aug 1994 08:35:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0688 Moonlighting *Shrew*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0688 Moonlighting *Shrew*
 
I can second the notion of using the Moonlighting "Shrew", known as "Atomic
Shakespeare" in class.  The contemporary jokes help the medicine go down.  It
has worked well in courses ranging from First Year Composition/Literature,
where it has been part of a comparison/contrast with such things as the BBC
"Shrew" with John Cleese of Monty Python, to the full blown seminar.
 
An added note, though:  unless the current students have a very good memory or
happen to catch Moonlighting on some stray cable channel, they do not know the
series' characters' contexts.  When I pulled it out of retirement last Spring,
some people went "That's Bruce Wills?!?  Was this before Die Hard 1?" or "Is
that the older lady who does hair dye commercials?"
 
How's that for the reading of a text changing with time?
 
Michael Young
Davis & Elkins College

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