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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: August ::
Re: Blayney Catalog; Natural Causes
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0694.  Wednesday, 24 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Leslie Thomson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Aug 1994 21:25:50 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0690  Re: Blayney/Folger Catalogue
 
(2)     From:   Dan Collins <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Aug 1994 11:07:54 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: Generic Expectations (Death by Natural Causes)
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Thomson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 23 Aug 1994 21:25:50 -0400
Subject: 5.0690  Re: Blayney/Folger Catalogue
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0690  Re: Blayney/Folger Catalogue
 
There are plenty of Peter Blayney's catalogue of his Folger exhibition in stock
at the Folger bookshop, and no doubt available my mail. It's $7.95 and well
worth it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan Collins <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Aug 1994 11:07:54 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Re: Generic Expectations (Death by Natural Causes)
 
Yeah, obviously the question is, what constitute natural causes?  As an
emergency room physician told me once, it's natural to die with five
bullets in your head.  If Gloucester and Lear die of natural causes, then
Enobarbus naturally must die of natural causes, too.  Characters eaten by
offstage bears bear deaths quite naturally, and Mutual of Omaha may have
an interest in providing us with interludes.  In some versions, Lear's
natural dies naturally a cold death for a play in which humor (unless
Lear's last scene strikes one as funny) and its defences have been
cruelly banished from a plot finally committed to tragedy.  Falstaff's
death, according to some commentators, was as natural as Greene's, whose
afterlife was quite unnatural.  What to do?  Maybe I've read too much
systems theory--or Wilde--but being alive at all seems the most unnatural
thing possible.
 
Contemplatively, Dan Collins
 

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