Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: August ::
Qs: *Err.* Research; Hamlet Trial; Holme Citations
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0705.  Wednesday, 31 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Miola <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 14:35:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   [Q: *Err.* Research]
 
(2)     From:   Leslie Harris <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, Aug 30 13:58:45 EDT 1994
        Subj:   Hamlet Trial
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 21:24:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Randle Holme
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Miola <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 14:35:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        [Q: *Err.* Research]
 
Am editing The Comedy of Errors volume for the Garland Critical Essays series
and would like to know of any interesting work being done on the play.  My
e-mail address is 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 .  Thanks.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Harris <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, Aug 30 13:58:45 EDT 1994
Subject:        Hamlet Trial
 
Hi, Folks.
 
I was talking to a colleague in our Math Department, and he told me about a
program he saw on television (most likely on PBS) relating to _Hamlet_.  On
that program, several Supreme Court justices debated the issue of whether
Hamlet was guilty of murder as a result of his actions during the play.
Questions of intentionality and of Hamlet's sanity came up, as they always do
when discussing the play.
 
Has anyone seen that program, and would you know how to acquire copies of it?
I'm teaching _Hamlet_ in a course this semester, and I think the video would
be a great way to stir discussion.
 
Thanks for your help.
 
Leslie Harris
Susquehanna University

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Aug 1994 21:24:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Randle Holme
 
Recently, I've spent some time reading around in Randle Holme's ACADEMY OF
ARMORY, OR, STOREHOUSE OF ARMORY AND BLAZON (Chester, 1688), a volume that has
something for everyone. In the Second Book (paginated independently), I found a
section on gilliflowers (Shakespeare's "Gilly-vors," WINTER'S TALE 4.4.82).
Holme records two rather suggestive names for "Gilliflowers mixed with red and
white": "The painted Lady" and "Crown of Bohemia" (p 64, H4v).
 
In THE WINTER'S TALE, Polixenes, who normally wears the crown of Bohemia,
argues that Perdita should cultivate the flowers. She responds: "Ile not
put/The Dible in earth, to set one slip of them:/No more then were I painted, I
would wish/This youth should say 'twer well" (1623 Folio, Hinman, TLN 1912-15).
Obviously an allusion to "the painted Lady"?
 
Were these names for the gilliflower available to Shakespeare? It's attempting
to think so. Or did the names develop from Shakespeare's play, proving the
popularity of WT in the seventeenth century? Or is this merely a coincidence?
 
I've check Pafford's Arden edition and, after a quick reading of footnotes and
appendix, I can't find a reference to these names.
 
And, to change the subject completely in Book Three, Holme has a section on
seventeenth-century printing (a subject he would know first hand) with
definitions and social customs (pp. 113ff., P1r). I can't recall seeing Holme
cited very frequently as a source on this subject. Am I wrong?
 
The Scolar Press reprinted THE ACADEMY in 1972.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.