1994

Oregon Shakespeare Festival 1995 Season

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0647.  Monday, 1 August 1994.
 
From:           Robert Teeter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Jul 1994 15:51:59 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        1995 Season, Oregon Shakespeare Festival (Ashland)
 
 
The Oregon Shakespeare Festival (Ashland) has announced its 1995 season.
 
        Elizabethan Stage (outdoors)
 
        Macbeth
        Richard II
        Merry Wives of Windsor
 
        Angus Bowmer Theater (indoors)
 
        Twelfth Night
 
The season runs from February to October (outdoors June to October).  For more
information, write or call
 
        OSF
        P.O. Box 158, 15 S. Pioneer
        Ashland, OR 97520
        (503) 482-4331
 
If you want to know about the non-Shakespearean plays or ask other questions
about the festival, e-mail me.  I have no connection with the festival except
as a long-time (mostly) satisfied customer.
 
        Robert Teeter
        San Jose, Calif.

Qs: Richard's Hump; Pericles; Hypertext Dissertation

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0646.  Monday, 1 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Jim Serchak <JRSn%TsPm%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 29 Jul 94 16:30:56 PDT
        Subj:   Richard III's Hump
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 30 Jul 1994 12:13:51 -0500
        Subj:   query: Pericles
 
(3)     From:   Carey Cummings <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 31 Jul 94 18:34:35 EDT
        Subj:   Hypertext
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Serchak <JRSn%TsPm%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 29 Jul 94 16:30:56 PDT
Subject:        Richard III's Hump
 
I'm currently working on an adaptation of Richard III at a directing workshop
in Berkeley.  We have arrived at an impasse regarding Richard III's
deformities.  Basically, two camps have developed within the group.  One
believes that Richard's deformities are primarily physical and range from
hunchback, crippled walk, twisted face, etc...  The other camp feels Richard's
deformities are psychological in nature.  We would appreciate any commentary
regarding productions you've seen, directed or acted in.  Also, any references
to the historical Richard would help. Our production is slated for 8/22/94, so
if you have a moment, please respond.
 
Thanks,
Jim Serchak
San Francisco
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Jul 1994 12:13:51 -0500
Subject:        query: Pericles
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans:
 
In beginning to think about directing *Pericles* this fall, I'm out searching
for good fodder for my brain.  I am most interested in the play as storytelling
(emphasis on Gower's role).  I'm also quite interested in it as a fable of
sorts (perseverence wins in the end).  I'd be most grateful for any suggestions
as to critical works that might be an important read for me.
 
Many thanks in advance.
                                                 Timothy Dayne Pinnow
                                                 St. Olaf College
                                                 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carey Cummings <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 31 Jul 94 18:34:35 EDT
Subject:        Hypertext
 
Help.  I'm posting this message for a friend who is preparing her dissertation
in hypertext.  She is almost through and finds that UMI does not appear to take
dissertations on disk or any media other than paper.  Does anyone out there
know of anyone doing similar work who may have gotten UMI to accept their work.
 Needless to say my friend, who is almost through with her work, is upset at
the prospect of not being able to follow through on her project.  SUNY Albany
requires a copy of the dissertation for UMI and if UMI won't take it maybe SUNY
won't either.  While she is working out the politics does anyone have any
advice that I can pass along to her.  Thanks in advance for any help.  As we on
the fabulous internet know paper is passe.

Re: Greening

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0644.  Monday, 1 August 1994.
 
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 29 Jul 1994 17:56:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0640  Re: Greening
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0640  Re: Greening
 
Terence Martin has said (5.0640) that he likes the simpler interpretation of
"ore-greene" (Booth, ed., 112.4). I'm not sure which interpretation is the
simpler or the simplest!
 
But Terence's reading of "or" as "ore" is certainly a possibility. According to
MacD. Jackson, Library 1 (1975): 24, George Eld's compositor B set G4, and
compositor B "would seem to have been rather more prone to error than A" (9),
especially literal errors and misunderstanding/misreading of his copy. So says
Jackson. And if we believe Jackson, B may have misread 112.8.
 
Some years ago, I wrote the following paraphrase of lines 7 and 8 in the
margins of Booth: "No one else in the world changes his 'steel'd sence" with
regard to 'right or wrong' -- or vice versa." If "steel glass" means
"perception of reality," then "steel'd sence" may have a similar meaning -- or
may mean "impregnable sensitivity." I don't find this reading very convincing
17 years later, but I thought I'd throw it out for debate.
 
And I would like to ask Piers Lewis to offer a paraphrase of lines 7-8, using
his idea that right and wrong are verbs. I'm having a difficult time with that
reading.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
P.S. to Greening
 
Pier Lewis says, "I particularly like her [i.e. Everett's] point about the
self-referentiality of the last line, which makes it into a sourly ironic joke
like the one about Greene" (5.0634). I've been looking for that passage in
Everett and can't find it. She does say, "Presumed perceptions of the real,
like the last line of Sonnet 112's 'the world,' dissolve into a hole in the
page: a disturbance faithfully registered by editorial emendation" (13). Is
that the passage?  If so, I miss the joke, so I gather there's something else.
 
Is the ironic joke of the last line ("That all the world besides me thinkes
y'are dead.") the idea that "all the world besides" means "in contradistinction
to the rest of humans"? Thus, "in contradistinction to all the other people, I
think you're dead."
 
Is that the joke?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Character: Titles, Categories, and Milk

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0645.  Monday, 1 August 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 29 Jul 1994 18:40:29 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Generic Expectations and Titles (5.0643)
 
(2)     From:   Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 01 Aug 1994 18:35:56 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 30 Jul 1994 18:04:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Categories
 
(4)     From:   E. L. Epstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 29 Jul 1994 21:16:04 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 29 Jul 1994 18:40:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Generic Expectations and Titles (5.0643)
 
Thomas Ellis makes some good points in his recent comment on David Schalkwyk's
question about titles. But how serious is his label for comedies: NOT TO BE
TAKEN SERIOUSLY? Don't we always laugh at things we take seriously? Isn't
comedy based on very serious tensions and conflicts in society (or culture if
you wish)? I'd says "yes" to both questions.
 
Which leads me to another question about generic expectations. I've heard
scholars say that they must determine the genre in order to interpret the text.
And I've heard other (equally opinionated) scholars say that genre is
meaningless to interpretation. Do playgoers really carry a big bag of generic
expectations along to a play?
 
One example: last night my 13 year old child and I went to see TAMING OF THE
SHREW. When Jesse heard Katherine say she would be revenged, he believed that
Katherine would kill Bianca at the end of the play. Or so he told me afterward.
(Jesse has seen many contemporary plays, but this is his first experience of a
Renaissance play).
 
(1) Do I have a peculiarly dense child? (2) Will he acquire "generic
expectations" as he grows older? (3) Might anyone who heard this play for the
first time have a similar reaction? (If you answer yes to [1] you are in big
trouble!)
 
Yours,  Bill Godshalk
 
P.S. The production of TAMING by Fahrenheit Theatre Group (Cincinnati) was
excellent.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 01 Aug 1994 18:35:56 +1000
Subject: 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
 
In reply to Thomas Ellis's assertion that all the comedy titles signify: NOT TO
BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY. I wonder at the worth of trying to group the plays anyway.
Nevertheless, "Midsummer Night's Dream" may suggest frivolity to many but it
was also the season of maypoles, and festivls which celebrated fertility and
sexuality. The lovers may think that by leaving Athens that they are leaving
the precinct of a restrictive court and thereby hope to have fun, but what
awaits them in the forest, especially for Helena, is a tantamount to
molestation. MND is fun but there is enough meat in it to make it  more than a
party pie!
 
Regards,
Scott Crozier
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Jul 1994 18:04:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Categories
 
Martin Mueller is right to be skeptical of category inclusion. Before we assert
WHY certain fluids are categorized together in a certain culture, we should
remember George Lakoff's discussion of women, fire, and dangerous things -- one
category in one Australian aboriginal culture. With western eyes, this suggests
that women are firey and dangerous, but, not so, Lakoff teaches us. We must
learn HOW and WHY a category is constructed inside a certain culture.
 
So if a certain alien culture has a category that links milk, mud, feces, and
blood -- we say, "Ah, ha. They think milk is DIRTY." However, once we find the
deep structure of the category, we find out that the culture has linked all
dense liquids that are essential to communal life. (This is a culture of my own
construction so don't ask for references.)
 
My point is, following Lakoff, that categories are tricky things. And, as far
as I can tell, all humans use categories to structure their knowledge, etc.
 
Categorically yours,  Bill Godshalk
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. L. Epstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 29 Jul 1994 21:16:04 EDT
Subject: 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0643  Re: Character: Milk and Titles
 
In re Mueller: Hottentots (Khoisan) equate Milk with feces and urine because in
cattle the milk comes from approximately the same part of the cow's body. ELE

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