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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: July ::
Re: Metrics; More on Saskstchewan Festival
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0607.  Wednesday 13 July 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Jul 1994 10:21:39 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0602 Re: Metre and Readings
 
(2)     From:   Peter Scott <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Jul 1994 20:16:55 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   More on Shakes on the Saskatchewan
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Jul 1994 10:21:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0602 Re: Metre and Readings
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0602 Re: Metre and Readings
 
As one whose metrical competency has now come in for attack, let me direct
readers back to my original posting.  My argument was primarily aimed at making
a particular reading of another line, "wood within this wood," audible, NOT at
legislating a particular performance reading of the line "I love thee not."
(Note the wording of my original posting--note the "if.")  That is, my aim in
stressing "thee" was *heuristic*, to underline the love triangle which is very
much in play in this passage, a point on which Professor Hawkins seems to agree
with me.  It was not to suggest that when these words are uttered they MUST be
said in that fashion, though the reading Professor Hawkins finds possible
though "unnecessarily insistent"--I LOVE THEE NOT--I find useful for clarifying
the emotional dynamic of the scenelet.  (That dynamic was not so apparent to
other posters, hence my trying to point it up.)  Of course, strictly
speaking--and we are apparently speaking strictly here--even that reading is
metrically untenable.  What then allows it at all, even as a possibility?  Is
meter, strictly speaking, so final a determiner of meaning and readings?  Is it
not rather one of several determiners (a powerful one, of course), each of
which is in interplay with others, the interplay of which may allow for
exceptions, gradations in stress, or performative variations?
 
Cheers,
Douglas M. Lanier
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Scott <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Jul 1994 20:16:55 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        More on Shakes on the Saskatchewan
 
The Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan Festival has been awarded one of the
American Bus Association's 1994 Top 100 Events in North America.
 

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