Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: July ::
Announcements: Med-Ren Conf; MARDE; TDR; HUMBUL
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0611.  Thursday, 14 July 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas M. Costa <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jul 94 14:11:20 EDT
        Subj:   Medieval-Renaissance Conference
 
(2)     From:   Marjorie Keyishian <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jul 1994 14:05:13 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   MARDE
 
(3)     From:   Lucia Ruedenberg  <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Jul 1994 21:59:42 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Announcing: TDR_forum 142
 
(4)     From:   Stuart Lee <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Jul 1994 10:59:42 +0100
        Subj:   HUMBUL - The Humanities Bulletin Board
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas M. Costa <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jul 94 14:11:20 EDT
Subject:        Medieval-Renaissance Conference
 
[Note Shakespeare session on Saturday.  For details, contact Dr. Costa.]
 
Medieval-Renaissance Conference VIII
Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia
October 6-8, 1994
Tentative Program
Thursday, Oct. 6
 6:00 PM-- Reception
 
Friday, Oct. 7
 8:00 AM-- Late Registration
 
 8:30 AM-- Call to Order and Welcome
 
 8:45 AM-- History
 
 Nicolas Agrait, Fordham University
   "Geography, Arab Internal Warfare, and Monarchy: The Development of the
   Kingdom of Asturias during the Early Middle Ages"
 Kathy L. Pearson, Old Dominion University
   "The Exercise of Territoriality in Early Medieval Bohemia"
 
 William L. White, Bluefield State College
   "Crusades Against the Cathares and Vaudois: Social and Economic Rationale
   for the Divergent Treatment of these Heresies"
 Kelly DeVries, Loyola College in Maryland
   "God, Admirals, Archery, and Flemings: Perceptions of Victory and Defeat at
   the Battle of Sluys, 1340"
 
 10:45 AM-- Literature
 
 Martha Hayes, Southern Connecticut State University
   "Heloise's Tenet of Love: An Amalgamation of the Carnal and the Spiritual"
 
 Kim D. Gainer, Radford University
   "New Visions from Old: Conservative Innovation in Narratives of Journeys to
   the Otherworld"
 Anne M. Wiles, James Madison University
   "Justice and Caritas in Dante's Paradiso"
 
 Shari Rambo, Clintwood, Virginia
   "Very Tragical Mirth: Images of Violence against Women in Jonson's Volpone"
 
 1:00-- Lunch
 
 2:00 PM-- Images and Reflections
 
 Ivan Castaneda, University of Virginia
   "The Human Figure as Transcendental Beauty: Michelangelo and the Aesthetics
   of Thomas Aquinas"
 
 Julia Horseman, East Tennessee State University
   "The Brancacci Chapel, Florence"
 
 Douglas W. Shrader, SUNY, Oneonta
   "Reflections in the Mirror of Eternity: Medieval-Renaissance Views of
   Spirit, Self, and the Afterlife"
 
 3:30 PM-- Reading the Middle Ages
 
 Ljiljana Milojevic, East Stroudsburg University
   "Cronica Sarracina by Pedro de Corral as a Historiographic Work"
 
 Wendell Frye, Hartwick College
   "Franz Guillparzer's King Ottokar's Rise and Fall and Ein Bruderzwist in
   Habsburg"
 
 4:30 PM-- Keynote Address
 
 Achim D. Koddermann, State University of New York, Oneonta
   "Why the Medieval Idea of the University is Still Modern"
 
 5:30 PM-- Reception
 
 6:30 PM-- Banquet
 
 8:00 PM-- Faculty Recital
 
 Saturday, September 25
 
 8:30 AM-- Coffee and Pastries
 
 9:00 AM-- Spenser's Faerie Queene
 
 Craig Dionne, Bluefield State College
   "Archimago's Magic Spells and Una's Angelic Face: Spenser's Faerie Queene
   and the Protestant Discourse of Iconoclasm"
 
 James W. Broaddus, Indiana State University
   "Faerie Queene and Physiology"
 
 10:30 AM-- Shakespeare
 
 Pamela Walters, University of Vermont
   "Henry V: Ideal Monarch or Master Manipulator"
 
 Deborah D'Agati, University of Vermont
   "Melancholy and the Macbeths"
 
 Robert L. Reid, Emory and Henry College
   "Fortunate Wheel: King Lear's Three Cycles of Humiliation"
 
 Richard Vela, Pembroke State College
   "Portentous Things: Knowledge and Death in Julius Caesar and Antony and
   Cleopatra"
 
 12:30 PM-- Light Luncheon
 
 1:15 PM--Milton's Paradise Lost
 
 James Stone, University of California, Berkeley
   "The Imperfect Whole: Androgyny and Loss in Paradise Lost"
 
 Mary Grabar, Georgia State University
   "Satan's Tears to Adam's Tears: Symbolism and Intersubjectivity in Paradise
   Lost"
 
 2:30 PM-- Adjourn
 
Tom Costa
Clinch Valley College

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marjorie Keyishian <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jul 1994 14:05:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        MARDE
 
*The Journal Medieval and Remaissance Drama in England* resumes publication
with volume 7 om December 1994.  The deadline for submissions to volume 8 is
August 31, 1994.  Send to:  Leeds Barroll, Editor;  Department of English;
University of Maryland;  5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore MD 21228-5398.  To
order volume 7 (cost $52.50) write Associated University Presses, 440 Forsgate
Drive, Cranbury NJ 08512;  or call (609) 655-4770 (Fax # 609 655-8366).  To
order back issues of MRDE. write AMS Press, 56 East 13 Street, New York NY
10003.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lucia Ruedenberg  <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Jul 1994 21:59:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Announcing: TDR_forum 142
  ______________________________________________________________________
                    ______   ______     ______
                    ######|  ######\    ######\
                      ##|    ##|  ##\   ##|__##|
                      ##|    ##|   ##|  ######/
                      ##|    ##|__##/   ##|  ##\
  ___________________ ##|    ######/    ##|   ##\_______________________
 
         The Journal of Performance Studies  T142 (Summer 1994)
 
                         TDR_FORUM ON PERFORM-L
 
  TDR is a quarterly journal that explores the diverse world of performance
  with an emphasis on the intercultural, interdisciplinary and experimental.
 
  The TDR_FORUM occurs on Perform-l, a discussion list for Performance
  Studies. Every quarter, we focus on one article from TDR's latest issue.
  Our discussion for the summer features:
 
          "Shanghai Revisted: Chinese Theatre and the Forces
           of the Market" - by David W. Jiang
 
  ______________________________________________________________________
                    ______   ______     ______
                    ######|  ######\    ######\
                      ##|    ##|  ##\   ##|__##|
                      ##|    ##|   ##|  ######/
                      ##|    ##|__##/   ##|  ##\
  ___________________ ##|    ######/    ##|   ##\_______________________
 
         The Journal of Performance Studies  T142 (Summer 1994)
 
                         TDR_FORUM ON PERFORM-L
 
  As many of you know by now...the TDR_FORUM occurs on Perform-l
  quarterly to stimulate discussion and exchange with the authors.
  This summer we feature the following article:
 
          "Shanghai Revisted: Chinese Theatre and the Forces
           of the Market" - by David W. Jiang
 
  David Jiang is a theatre and TV director/actor, who is
  educated in Shanghai, China. He was a grantee of the Asian
  Cultural Council and a visiting scholar in New York University,
  Performance Studies from 1989 to 1991. He is now doing a theatre
  research project with the University of Leeds, U.K.
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------
  Excerpt from:
  TDR T142 Summer 1994
  Shanghai Revisited: Chinese Theatre and the Forces of the Market
  David W. Jiang
 
  Summer 1993 in Shanghai, China's biggest city and cultural
  center: I had not been there in four years, since I left for
  America. I must say, I was impressed by the newly built-high
  rises and the vibrant appearance of the business districts, but
  when I opened a newspaper all I saw were ads for Hong Kong films,
  Taiwan pop stars, night clubs, and of course karaoke. No theatre.
  When I walked by theatres I knew full well nothing theatrical was
  happening. Box offices were empty, posters advertised everything
  but theatre, entrances led to clothing stores, fast food shops,
  expensive cafes, discos, and karaokes. Theatres have set up
  businesses like these on their premises. Auditoriums were used
  for non-theatre events: no rehearsals, no artists. "Call them at
  home," the receptionists suggested, "because they never come
  here." What happened?
  -----------------------------------------------end of excerpt---------
 
  Subscribe to Perform-l by sending e-mail to: 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 ,
  with one line in the body of the msg: sub perform-l yourrealname.
 
  To download Jiang's artictle via anonymous ftp:
 
       ftp acfcluster.nyu.edu,
       cd perform
       get tdr_jiang.txt.
       quit
 
  To get Jiang's article via e-mail:
 
       Send e-mail to: 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
       Leave subject blank.
       Put only this line, just as it appears, in the letter:
 
           send [anonymous.perform]tdr_jiang.txt
 
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------
  Direct questions or problems subscribing to the discussion list to:
           Lucia Ruedenberg  
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Lee <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 14 Jul 1994 10:59:42 +0100
Subject:        HUMBUL - The Humanities Bulletin Board
 
HUMBUL - The Humanities Bulletin Board (Report)
 
For some years now the Office for Humanities Communication has been maintaining
an electronic Bulletin Board for the Humanities, known as HUMBUL (now based at
Oxford). When established it was seen that there was a need for a central
location at which humanities academics could access (remotely) information on
various associations, institutions, projects, etc, of interest to humanities
computing. Such a central resource was clearly lacking in the mid-eighties and
HUMBUL was designed to fill this gap.
 
Written under the USERBUL software (designed at Leicester University) HUMBUL
ran successfully for nearly eight years. For the last three years it has been
my responsibility to edit and maintain the various sections. At its peak it
attracted over 5,000 subscribers and was accessed nearly 1,000 times a month.
 
However, due to the substantial increase in electronic resources, gopher sites,
world-wide-web pages, and software to aid the accessing and searching of the
Internet, HUMBUL began to look like a bit of a dinosaur. This, coupled with the
fact that USERBUL was no longer operational with the installation of new
software at Oxford University, has meant that the policy of maintaining such a
large resource has had to be reviewed. Before considering the possibility of
moving HUMBUL to a gopher site I researched the resources available to
academics through the Internet. It was clear that whereas in the mid-eighties
HUMBUL was a good central point for most scholars, now, with the advent of WWW,
Gopher, VERONICA, etc, the gap that needed to be filled all those years ago was
no longer there. Consequently, the decision has been taken to close down HUMBUL
as of July, 1994.
 
Nevertheless, the name still lives on. As part of the growing need for gateways
to other resources, I have established the HUMBUL Gateway which provides a
means of accessing international resources applicable to the humanities with
relative ease. The time and effort spent on maintaining the old bulletin board
will now be diverted to the updating of this web service. To access this you
need a WWW viewer such as Mosiac, Lynx, etc. The address is:
 
http://www.ox.ac.uk/depts/humanities/
 
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who have helped in the
running of HUMBUL for so long, be they support staff, or contributors.
Particular thanks to the following without whom HUMBUL would not have been the
success it clearly was: Paul Bryant, Marilyn Deegan, Dave Hastings, Susan
Hockey, May Katzen, Jim Morris, and Chris Mullings.
 
Stuart Lee
HUMBUL Editor, 1991-1994
****************************
Dr Stuart Lee
Research Officer
CTI Centre for Textual Studies
Oxford University Computing Services
13 Banbury Road
Oxford
OX2 6NN
Tel:0865-273221/283282
Fax:0865-273221
E-mail: 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.