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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: July ::
Re: Ride; Peace; Dirt; Elizabeth; E-Journal
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0637.  Tuesday, 26 July 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jul 1994 13:04:32 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0628 Q: Ride from London to Stratford
 
(2)     From:   Steven Marx <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jul 1994 12:46:18 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0632 Re: Character (plus War and Peace)
 
(3)     From:   Nina Walker <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jul 1994 16:54:41 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0627  Re: Character
 
(4)     From:   Ed Pechter <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jul 1994 20:06:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0636  Qs: Elizabeth at Theatre
 
(5)     From:   James Zeiger <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Jul 1994 21:18:34 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: E-Shakespeare
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jul 1994 13:04:32 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0628 Q: Ride from London to Stratford
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0628 Q: Ride from London to Stratford
 
Dear Everybody, Bernice's signal about a ride to Stratford from London on
Sunday August 21st inspires me to point out that I will be taking the
12:05 bus from Heathrow (#205) arriving near Warwick at the "Little Chef"
restaurant on the Warwick By-Pass, about 8 miles from Stratford, at 2:20
PM. There, I am to take a taxi to Stratford. Anyone else out there in
the same boat (bus) and interested in sharing the taxi fare? Ken Rothwell
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Marx <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jul 1994 12:46:18 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 5.0632 Re: Character (plus War and Peace)
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0632 Re: Character (plus War and Peace)
 
In addition to the strong pacifist sentiments of the "London Reformers"--Colet,
Linacre, More and Erasmus--documented by Robert P. Adams in _The Better Part of
Valor_ by Robert P. Adams, and the attitudes expressed by Williams and Burgundy
in _Henry V-, King James made his personal motto "Beati Pacifici," blessed are
the peacemakers.  His reputation as one of these extended as far as Poland and
Spain, and he and his son Charles went to great lengths to establish
anti-militarist culture at court.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nina Walker <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jul 1994 16:54:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0627  Re: Character
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0627  Re: Character
 
Although I am in agreement with those who find the current conversation about
emblematic character going nowhere fast, I must protest the misinterpretation
of Mary Douglas's definition of dirt as matter out of place. All fecal matter
outside the body (which is where it is made and is natural) becomes dirt
because it is outside of it's place. The same becomes true of urine and in
particular blood. Culture be damned. As soon as it comes out of the body, it's
dirt. This has led to real problems with human attitudes about menstrual blood,
since blood ought to be in its proper place--in the body. This is a
particularly dirty piece of business as most cultures would have it.(Tell me of
one that has thought differently!) From that rather universal (God forgive me
for use of the word) attitude cultures then derive their own methods of
handling 'things out of place' and thus we have the multitude of differences in
ritual and taboo. But clearly, Douglas's rule was a general one. Whether I
plant it or pitch it is determined by environmental and historical forces.
However, I don't think Douglas had in mind that I would love it. If I did, then
it is not dirt according to her theory. This may be true also of, as Ben
Schneider puts it, "some really anthropologically studiable group" (as if we
weren't) like those Maori's who share no human attributes with 16th century
Englishmen or 20th century Shakespeareans. For my part, I believe I share a
common distaste for "dirt" especially when it gets on my shoe. The fact that I
wear shoes becomes a point of departure determined soley by my environment and
my mother's wishes
 
Nina Walker

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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pechter <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jul 1994 20:06:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0636  Qs: Elizabeth at Theatre
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0636  Qs: Elizabeth at Theatre
 
I think the "recent critic" referred to in David Schalkwyk's letter is probably
L. A. Montrose in an essay on *A Midsummer Night's Dream*, that appeared in
vol2 of *Representations* and has been frequently reprinted.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Zeiger <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Jul 1994 21:18:34 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        Re: E-Shakespeare
 
W. L. Godshalk brings up an interesting point.
 
SHAKSPER, as one of the most active lists on the Internet, certainly comes
close to qualifying as a complete journal.  Undoubtedly, a very respectable
journal could be fashioned from its contents.  However, as the co-editor of the
first electronic theatre journal, THEATRE.PERSPECTIVES.INTERNATIONAL (tpi), I
can tell you that such an undertaking can become quite a time-consuming
project.
 
A chance for a trial run exists at this time since tpi will be spotlighting
Shakespeare in our third issue, due for release Sept. 30. We invite submissions
from all SHAKSPER readers on any aspect of the subject.  We also would like to
invite performance reviews of the productions to be seen this summer at the
various Shakespeare festivals worldwide.
 
While THEATRE.PERSPECTIVES.INTERNATIONAL intends to cover the full spectrum of
theatrical performance, theory, and criticism, our Fall issue may provide an
ideal opportunity to test W. L. Godshalk's idea.  Send ideas and submissions
to:
 
Jim Zeiger

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or
 
David Reifsnyder

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We also welcome inquiries from anyone wishing to receive copies of our first
two issues, or needing information on our listserv.
 

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