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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: June ::
Hollywood Bard; Light; Concordance; Philosophers;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0501.  Sunday, 6 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   David Joseph Kathman <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Jun 94 17:46:11 CDT
        Subj:   Hollywood Bard
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Saturday, 04 Jun 1994 20:48:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0493  Re: Light and Heat
 
(3)     From:   David Scott Wilson-Okamura <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Jun 94 20:56:54 CDT
        Subj:   Spevack concordance
 
(4)     From:   Luc Borot <
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        Date:   Sunday, 5 Jun 1994 14:14:24 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Philosophers
 
(5)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 05 Jun 1994 15:46:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The stately legate of the Persian King, Once More
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Joseph Kathman <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Jun 94 17:46:11 CDT
Subject:        Hollywood Bard
 
Dear SHAKSPERians:
 
There's a movie which just opened Friday (at least here in the U.S.) called
*Renaissance Man*, in which Danny DeVito plays a guy who gets a job teaching
Shakespeare to new recruits on an Army base.  He gets them into the Bard by
such techniques as having them do a rap version of *Hamlet* (one of the
recruits is played by rapper Marky Mark), and apparently there's one scene
where one of the recruits recites Henry's St. Crispin's Day speech from *Henry
V* to their incredulous sergeant.  I haven't actually seen the movie --- I
gleaned the above from several reviews I read.  These reviews were negative but
not scathing --- apparently the plot is fairly predictable --- but it sounds
like it could be interesting for the folks on this list, especially those who
teach Shakespeare for a living.  If anybody out there has seen the movie, or
plans to, maybe they could post a review.
 
Dave Kathman

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Saturday, 04 Jun 1994 20:48:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0493  Re: Light and Heat
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0493  Re: Light and Heat
 
Thank you, Dave Evett and Ron Moyer, for clearing up my confusion. I should
have checked Hibbard.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Scott Wilson-Okamura <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Jun 94 20:56:54 CDT
Subject:        Spevack concordance
 
If anyone is still looking for the Spevack concordance, I've seen two at the
Seminary Coop Bookstore in Chicago.  Phone: 312/752-4381 or 312/752-1959,
5757 South University Ave., Chicago, IL 60610.
 
                                                Yours faithfully,
                                                David Wilson-Okamura
                                                
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <
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  >
Date:           Sunday, 5 Jun 1994 14:14:24 +0100
Subject:        Re: Philosophers
 
Matthew Westcott Smith <V109LV3R@UBVMS.BITNET> asks if we can find other
references to philosophers other than Aristotle and Machiavelli.
 
Matthew, what do you exactly mean by 'reference'? do you want ONLY the
philosophes *named*, or others just alluded to, or would you also be interested
in the titles of their works or the use of their best-known concepts if we
encounter such information? It would extend the search quite a lot. There is
quite a lot of platonist or neo-platonist allusions, many in the sonnets, and
especially concerning love. In a collaboration with others, Shakespeare was
involved in a play on a philosopher: Sir Thomas More, though More was not
involved as philosopher but rather as statesman.
 
I can't find if the Cicero in *JC* is THE Cicero, and I don't have the time and
annotated editions to check it here at home. I'm interested, so I will try to
find others. If you only want the names mentioned, use a concordance, but
beware of homonymies, which may be the case for the above-mentioned Cicero...
 
If I may venture a very poor joke, you have the rape of Lucrece, which a French
student of mine once thought was an episode of the life of Lucretius, since the
woman and the philosopher have the same name in French: 'Lucr\ece'...
 
Weather's fine down here, but student papers are on my desk; I will take them
to the balcony, where I can face the task with less boredom and greater
equanimity, which is a good thing for the students. I'd rather go to the beach,
but duty calls and deadlines kill my philosophical headonism from time to time.
 
Enough with self-pity. Fare ye well,
                                                Philosophically,
                                                        Luc
 
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 05 Jun 1994 15:46:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The stately legate of the Persian King, Once More
 
A few weeks ago, I asked if anyone could help me find an historical basis for
the following lines in THE TAMING OF A SHREW: "As was the Massie Robe that late
adornd/The stately legate of the Persian King" (Scene vii, 46-47, Bullough,
Vol. I, p. 85). Although I received several suggestions, nothing immediately
surfaced.
 
A few days ago, I read the following in David Bradley's FROM TEXT TO
PERFORMANCE IN THE ELIZABETHAN THEATRE: PREPARING THE PLAY FOR THE STAGE
(Cambridge U.P., 1992): "In ALPHONSUS, KING OF ARAGON, the lords in Act IV are
sent as 'Legats to god Mahomet', and recall a visit from 'the stately legate of
the Persian King'" (p. 256, note 21). I don't own a copy of Greene's aplay, and
rushed to the library to get one. I found the first line quoted (Malone Society
reprint, line 1232), but now that I have read Act IV three times I say with
some confidence that "the stately legate of the Persian King" is NOT there. I
have skimmed the rest of the play several times, just in case: no Persian
legate did I find.
 
Now, the question is: Did Bradley import the reference to the stately Persian
legate from A SHREW? Or is it from another play? If the simile is from another
play, we may have a dating argument for A SHREW.
 
I've tried to find Monash University (Bradley's academic home) on gopher, and
it's not there. Does Bradley have e-mail? Does anyone have his e-mail address?
Or, heaven forfend, must I send him a letter on PAPER? I am, of course, hoping
that Bradely can clear up this little problem.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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