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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: June ::
Re: Shakespeare and Disney
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0561.  Thursday, 23 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   James P. Saeger <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jun 1994 10:03:17 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
(2)     From:   Jon Enriquez <ENRIQUEZJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jun 1994 09:53:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0548  Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
(3)     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 23 Jun 1994 08:36:34 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0555  Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
(4)     From:   J F Knight <
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        Date:   Thursday, 23 Jun 1994 23:26:28 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   [Disney]
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James P. Saeger <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jun 1994 10:03:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
In reply to William Proctor Williams:
 
I was a bit confused by your suggestion that
 
        Disney is the total negation of what, I think, we are all
        about.  This is more than a joke; it shows, I fear, what the
        study and teaching of Shakespeare has sunk to.
 
Notwithstanding plot similarities that others have noticed, I see Disney (a big
player in the for-profit, mass-market, popular entertainment industry and one
that has produced pieces of enduring cultural interest) as extremely relevant
to Shakespeare.
 
As the members of the list well know, Shakespeare's position as shareholder in
the Chamberlain's/King's Servants made him, along with the company, a big
player in 16th- & 17th-century London's for-profit, mass-market, popular
entertainment industry.  And Chamberlain's/King's, like Disney, produced pieces
of enduring cultural interest.
 
 James P. Saeger
 
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 English Dept, U of Pennsylvania
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jon Enriquez <ENRIQUEZJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jun 1994 09:53:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0548  Re: Shakespearean Disney
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0548  Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
And here I was thinking that *The Lion King* sounded a lot like *The Spanish
Tragedy*...
 
Jon Enriquez
Georgetown University
ENRIQUEZJ@guvax     (Bitnet)
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Thursday, 23 Jun 1994 08:36:34 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0555  Re: Shakespearean Disney
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0555  Re: Shakespearean Disney
 
Steven Marx and Rick Jones suggest that Disney is not necessarily the enemy. I
have to agree.
 
In my cubicle at work, I have three decorations. One is a poster of the young
Walt Disney standing in a doorway, with the shadow of Mickey Mouse greeting
him. Another is a trading card from Gladstone Publishing, showing a pacing,
ranting Uncle Scrooge (card #15 in the series of Carl Barks' Heroes and
Villains). A third is a poster reproducing the Folio portrait of Shakespeare,
advertising "Mr. William Shakespeares Documentary Life set forth by S.
Schoenbaum and Printed according to the True Originall Copies."
 
Why do I have these on my wall? Because Walt Disney, Carl Barks, William
Shakespeare, and Samuel Schoenbaum are my heroes. Why are they my heroes?
Because they are all MASTERS OF STORY. They can all, in their own way and in
their own chosen medium, produce a "ripping good yarn."
 
Masters of Story and ripping good yarns are hard to come by. Meet them early in
the form of cartoons by Disney and comics by Barks; learn to recognize and
appreciate the Real Thing; and you may go on later to recognize and appreciate
the Real Thing in more "adult" contexts.
 
     Tad Davis
     
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J F Knight <
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Date:           Thursday, 23 Jun 1994 23:26:28 +1000 (EST)
Subject:        [Disney]
 
Am I the only member who is offended by the use of the names Shakespeare
and Disney in such close conjunction?
 

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