1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0576.  Monday, 27 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Charles Edelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jun 94 11:08:00 EDT
        Subj:   AYLI Request
 
(2)     From:   John Mucci <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Jun 1994 09:01:34 -0400
        Subj:   *AYLI* resonances
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Edelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jun 94 11:08:00 EDT
Subject:        AYLI Request
 
While I am not sure Jim Schaefer will find exactly what he is looking for about
AYLI in terms of 'sexual/political (or other?) identity/ambiguity' discourse, I
would still enthusiastically recommend (to anyone doing work on the play) Alan
Brissenden's excellent introduction in his just published New Oxford edition.
 
While I am typing, thanks to all so far for responses to my Hamlet soliloquy
query.  Please keep those cards and letters coming in.
 
Charles Edelman, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Jun 1994 09:01:34 -0400
Subject:        *AYLI* resonances
 
Regarding *As You Like It* and the further study of the confusion of roles,
manners, dress, and sexual orientation, there is a lovely use of Shakespeare's
play, sunk in a large part of the novel *Mademoiselle de Maupin,* by Theophile
Gautier. In the book, the main character can only reveal herself truly to her
lover when playing the role of Rosalind, while at other times must be dressed
and act as a man to achieve the power and comfort she desires.  The guilt which
her lover feels, upon finding himself being attracted to what appears to be a
young man makes up an interesting character study in itself, and his poetic
descriptions of de Maupin performing a perfect Rosalind--to his Orlando, make
up some of the best parts of the book.
 
John Mucci
GTE VisNet

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