1994

Re: Shakespearean Disney

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0545.  Monday, 20 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 15:38:23 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
(2)     From:   Larry Schwartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 19:46:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
(3)     From:   Patricia Gallagher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 22:33:50 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Shakespearean Disney
 
(4)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 23:41:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 15:38:23 -0300
Subject: 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
Regarding parallels with The Lion King:
 
What about Morgan, et. al, in Cymbeline?  They seem to form a sort of academy
that the heirs (Posthumous and Imogen) pass through and learn from.  I don't
know what Imogen learns, but Posthumous seems at least partially redeemed in my
eyes by his association with these foils to the poisoned court.
 
        Anyway, just my 2c worth.
        Sean Lawrence.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Schwartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 19:46:44 -0500
Subject: 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
Today's (6/19) NYTimes' Arts & Leisure section has a front-page, above-the-fold
story about "The Lion King," addressing its Shakespearean parallels, as well as
its suitability for children.  As Joe Bob Briggs would say, "check it out!"
 
Larry Schwartz, Humanities Librarian
North Dakota State University
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Gallagher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 22:33:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Shakespearean Disney
 
I saw "The Lion King" last week, and there are allusions to "Hamlet". In fact,
the NY Press commented on it before the film opened (and I believe the Disney
Organization is confirming the Shakespearean influence). I do think that, while
there might be some loose referencing to Henry IV, Part, I, it is a stretch.
The companions are not evil, and in fact, aid Simba in his attempt to recover
his throne.
 
By the way, a few years ago, I was with a very young (3 and 1/2 years old)
friend of mine, and I wanted to watch a version of "Hamlet" that was airing on
PBS. I explained the plot to her, in advance, as the story of a man whose
father was killed by his uncle. That the uncle then married the man's mother,
and that, as a result the man didn't like his uncle at all. She accepted that
plot summary (brief as it was), watched the story with me (we explained Ophelia
when we got to it), and the next day was the only child in her nursery school
who knew who Shakespeare is.
 
Patricia E. Gallagher
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 23:41:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0541  Shakespearean Disney
 
To Lynn Parks:
 
The front page of today's Arts and Leisure section of the NY Times is headlined
"A Bambi for the `90's Via Shakespeare" and contains a story about the "Hamlet"
animated film THE LION KING.  The point is to defend the film against those who
think the death of the father too brutal for young eyes.  But your point is
clearly made as well.
 
Best,
Milla Riggio

Re: Similarities

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0544.  Monday, 20 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert S. Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 09:32:57 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0542 Q: Similarities
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 15:33:49 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0542  Q: Similarities
 
(3)     From:   David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 94 18:28:14 CDT
        Subj:   Re:  SHK 5.0542  Q: Similarities
 
(4)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 20:12:36 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Similarities
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert S. Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 09:32:57 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 5.0542 Q: Similarities
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0542 Q: Similarities
 
And sunglasses in place of the handkerchief.  Arise, black vengeance, from the
hollow hell.  (O.J. the hell-o).
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 15:33:49 -0300
Subject: 5.0542  Q: Similarities
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0542  Q: Similarities
 
Where's the "history of spousal abuse" in Othello?  It seems altogether alien
and, to Desdemona at last, utterly surprising when it occurs.
 
That said, it's a pretty interesting comparison.
 
        Cheers,
        Sean Lawrence.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 94 18:28:14 CDT
Subject: 5.0542  Q: Similarities
Comment:        Re:  SHK 5.0542  Q: Similarities
 
I applaud E. H. Pearlman's trenchant observation of the similarities between O.
J. Simpson and Othello.  These parallels are much too striking to be the result
of coincidence; we all know Samuel Schoenbaum was off his rocker when he said
that "life and art are full of cunning parallels". Thus, I think we should
acknowledge the inevitable conclusion: O. J. Simpson wrote *Othello* (or at
least the parts that weren't written by Erich von Daniken).
 
Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 19 Jun 1994 20:12:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Similarities
 
Elihu Pearlman forgot the the "suicide" theme in his list of similarities.
Oscar Wilde told us that life imitates art, but I find this particular instance
too sad for my usual frivolity and quips.
 
Sadly, I remain,
Bill Godshalk

Q: Similarities

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0542.  Sunday, 19 June 1994.
 
From:           E. H. Pearlman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 18 Jun 1994 07:52:39 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        [Similarities]
 
Has anyone yet noted the similarities between Othello and O. J. Simpson: black
male and white woman, history of spousal abuse, murder of wife and friend,
claims he loved his wife "too much," etc?
 
E. Pearlman

Re: Iachimo; Prospero and Miranda; Titania

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0543.  Sunday, 19 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Linda Woodbridge <LWOODBRI@UALTAVM>
        Date:   Thursday, 16 Jun 94 15:45:40 MDT
        Subj:   SHK 5.0476  Q: Iachimo in a Box
 
(2)     From:   Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 18 Jun 1994 07:50:43 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Prospero, Miranda
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Saturday, 18 Jun 1994 20:30:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0540  Re: Bottom, Titania, Sex
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Linda Woodbridge <LWOODBRI@UALTAVM>
Date:           Thursday, 16 Jun 94 15:45:40 MDT
Subject: Q: Iachimo in a Box
Comment:        SHK 5.0476  Q: Iachimo in a Box
 
Bill Godshalk -- you recall my being "skeptical" about your Iachimo-in-a-box --
actually, I rather like the idea, and I can also visualize a staging of *A
Chaste Maid in Cheapside* where, in the rather camp scene in which Moll
Yellowhammer and Touchwood Junior rise from their coffins, the actors could pop
up like jacks-in-the box--it would suit the tongue-in-cheek aura of this
"resurrection," I think. Cheers!
 
                                       Sincerely,
                                       Linda Woodbridge
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 18 Jun 1994 07:50:43 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Prospero, Miranda
 
Thanks to those who have so quickly and generously responded to my question
about one approach to *The Tempest*.  I don't mean to mount an elaborate
defense of my remarks, but I would like to respond to some of the early
questions before the discussion (if it continues) becomes too complex to
handle.
 
First, John Cox's trenchant reminder of the "character" problem: You are right;
Prospero has no psychology, but you and I do, and so had Shakespeare.  Thus,
the configuration of elements (especially when taken together with the example
of *Lear*) becomes the mandala for a meditation upon the relationship between a
daughter and her father and the development of a grammar of motives appropriate
to the circumstances provided by the text.  Some considerations for that
meditation: there is no sign of a mediating mother.  The father is extremely
skeptical of the society into which he is sending his beloved daughter,
especially so, given the background mourning of Alonzo for the daughter HE has
lost to the greater world. Powerfully implicit is the enormous temptation to
keep her in isolation to himself. The perversity of such a choice (and
Miranda's sexual maturity) are signalled by Caliban's attempted rape. Throw in
whatever "historicizing" one wishes to this configuration, we still have but a
mandala.
 
Piers Lewis's question about "evidence" in the text pointing to the
transformation of Caliban into Prince Ferdy: being an old Barberian (C.L., that
is) I have always paid close attention to the elements of "disorder" that allow
for the drift of identities and the need (and possibility) for all kinds of
redefinitions--the dream-world setting of hallucination and illusion; the
revolt of underlings, death by water, etc.--but especially the humiliation of
the powerful: making Ferd take Cal's place in the menial tasks of water and
wood fetching.  I.e., Ferdinand is made to take on Caliban's identity.
Sexuality is transformed from attemted rape into the elaborate dance of
courtship, with all the inhibitions attending the symbolic barrier of
virginity.
 
And finally, to Phyllis Rackin's comment: "I wonder how Edenic a world w/o
prohibitions against rape would be for rape victims." Precisely. Civilization
and its Discontents all over again. The persistence of rape across cultural and
historical boundaries argues the necessity for the protection of women from men
by powerful symbolic and physical restraints, thus laying the ground for the
subordination and possession of women by their protectors. Our present struggle
is to make this fatal configuration seem less inevitable, less dependent upon
irrational taboos and more available to reason and personal identification: "I,
too, am victimized by such attacks upon human dignity." Pray God deliver us
from the inchoate rages and compulsions that we have recently taken to calling
"the rape culture" (in hopes of making it seem more available to social
therapies) and into a new era of tender mutuality (but my hopes are not very
high). In MY Shakespeare, visiting the monster in the underworld is always the
first step toward release from fear and resentment into compassion and
generosity.  In other words, recognition does more for us than repression ("I
know you all, and will for a while [time?]..."--or however that goes.)
Regression to a symbolic madness or savagery may be the condition for the
reinvention of a failed system of restraints.
 
Oh, and about Ferdinand supposedly cheating at chess: I think there are much
too many indicators of his capacity for selfless affection to consign him
already to the pack of cynics to whom Miranda is being delivered.  But enough
blabber from me.
 
Thanks, all, for the lovely conversation.
 
Lonnie
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Saturday, 18 Jun 1994 20:30:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0540  Re: Bottom, Titania, Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0540  Re: Bottom, Titania, Sex
 
Topic: "Enforced chastity" again
 
I think that Don Foster may be misreading "enforced chastity" as "forced
chastity," i.e., rape. I take Titania at her word: "enforced chastity" means
"forced to be chaste." Bevington's note (3.1.195) gives both readings, but
comments: "Titania at this moment is hardly concerned about chastity." I agree,
and Titania sees the moon as weeping for all those maidens who must remain
virgins. The tradition of the chaste moon is turned upside down.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Shakespearean Disney; Bristol Essay and More

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0541.  Sunday, 19 June 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Lynn A. Parks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Fri, 17 Jun 1994 09:08:19 CST
        Subj:   Shakespearean Disney?
 
(2)     From:   James Nielson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 17 Jun 94 12:35:37 PST
        Subj:   How many authors had Lady Macbeth?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lynn A. Parks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Fri, 17 Jun 1994 09:08:19 CST
Subject:        Shakespearean Disney?
 
My son, upon recent emancipation from the hospital, received from a friend a
boxed set of Disney's "The Lion King" action figures.  On the back of the box
was a synopsis of the movie's action.  It seems a good king has a young son and
an evil brother.  The evil brother kills the good king and usurps the throne.
The young son, now in danger, leaves the court for the backwoods, where he is
tutored by good-hearted but low-class characters (including a warthog).  When
matured, the son returns to confront the usurping uncle.
 
I could not help but think of parallels with _Hamlet_ and _I Henry IV_ while
reading the synopsis.  Am I stretching things too far?  Has anyone seen the
movie yet?
 
Happy viewing, you parents, Shakespeareans, and Disney fans!
 
P.S.  I tried to tell my son the story of _Hamlet_, so that he would have a
framework for viewing the movie, but I had trouble boiling it down to a
three-year-old's sensibilities.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Nielson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Jun 94 12:35:37 PST
Subject:        How many authors had Lady Macbeth?
 
My colleague Rob Holton has been giving some thought to the authorship question
and it seemed to me that his take on it demanded some consideration. I am
sending along the most recent and lapidary statement of his view that I have
received from him. P.S. Michael D. Bristol at McGill has a paper on the Knights
essay "HOW MANY CHILDREN HAD LADY MACBETH." I don't believe it is in print
anywhere yet, but he might be willing to share it with you.
 
                                                        (Arthur Quilted-Couch)
 
Since von Daniken was the only one smart enough to understand that true high
points of our culture are gifts from aliens, the question _must_ then arise:
how did he know?  Only one explanation is possible.  Von Daniken himself is a
member of this vastly superior and highly advanced alien race!  No other
explanation holds up!  And in his (its) own quiet way, that's what he's been
trying to tell us all this time.  Now, this has a very direct bearing on the
authorship question of course.  At the very least, von Daniken is related by
blood to the author of the so-called "Shakespeare" plays.  At the very least!
And, given the possibility (nay, the probability) that this highly developed
alien species possesses a longevity undreamt of in this quaint hinterland of
the universe, is it not possible/probable too that von Daniken himself--who has
after all shown himself to be so aware of human life forms-- IS THE TRUE AUTHOR
OF THOSE PLAYS!!!  No other explanation holds water! At last this "shakespeare"
chicanery can be halted.  The question now becomes one of disseminating this
explosive information.  And how will von Daniken react to being unmasked?
Since he is one of Them, anything is possible.  I think we ought to proceed
carefully on this.

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