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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: February ::
Re: *Goodnight* Allusion; Shakespeare Ban
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0088.  Friday, 4 February 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <ANNAL@TEMPLEVM>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Feb 94 08:22:32 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0071  Q: *Goodnight Desdemona* Allusion
 
(2)     From:   Michael Harrawood <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Feb 1994 10:37:18 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0085  Qs: Comic Book Shakespeare; Shakespeare Ban
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <ANNAL@TEMPLEVM>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Feb 94 08:22:32 EST
Subject: 5.0071  Q: *Goodnight Desdemona* Allusion
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0071  Q: *Goodnight Desdemona* Allusion
 
A somewhat late response to Michael's question about heads. Although I haven't
seen *Goodnight Desdemona*, could it be a reference to the lines from *Othello*
? "And men whose heads did grow beneath their shoulders". 1.2, I believe, it's
from the scene where Desdemona explains how Othello won her love with stories
of his life.
                Annalisa Castaldo
                Temple University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Harrawood <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 3 Feb 1994 10:37:18 -0800
Subject: 5.0085  Qs: Comic Book Shakespeare; Shakespeare Ban
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0085  Qs: Comic Book Shakespeare; Shakespeare Ban
 
This is a message to Chris Kendall, re Shakespeare and Nazi Germany.  I've
never posted here before, so I hope it comes through.
 
Chris.  It might be fun to have your class watch Mephisto and to discuss the
production of Hamlet they are working on at the end of that film.  I did this
a few years back with a 1B class here at Berkeley, and then showed them the
Mel Gibson Hamlet, with special emphasis on the issue of overhearing and
surviellance.  I told my students that the Gibson Hamlet was the same versiou
they were doing in Mephisto.  This, naturally, provoked a lot of hot discussion
and a few really good papers.  Anyway, this is not really a historical record
but it may help.
 
Michael Harrawood
 

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